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Sorry...I was referring to the tires being filled with the Nitrogen. The dealer would be the one doing this correct?? I think they are will charge $99.00 as it it an option on the Purchase Order
Yeah, it's a dealership thing.

For example, we put nitrogen in all of the cars that are delivered here, and wheel locks on them as well.

Unless we've put other accessories (like body side moldings or door edge guards) on the car so there is an actual addendum, we don't bother charging for them, and then it's free nitrogen for life from us if you need it.

We DO have severe temperature fluctuations from hot to cold and back again that a tire with simply air in it will notice. Up north, it's more a case of make sure you actually have air in the tire, because when it gets cold ... and then gets COLDER ... tires notice.
 

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Yeah, it's a dealership thing.

For example, we put nitrogen in all of the cars that are delivered here, and wheel locks on them as well.

Unless we've put other accessories (like body side moldings or door edge guards) on the car so there is an actual addendum, we don't bother charging for them, and then it's free nitrogen for life from us if you need it.

We DO have severe temperature fluctuations from hot to cold and back again that a tire with simply air in it will notice. Up north, it's more a case of make sure you actually have air in the tire, because when it gets cold ... and then gets COLDER ... tires notice.
Thanks @Carl Abrams. I appreciate the feed back. I am not sure how the dealer handles the nitrogen going forward. I will inquire with them. It appears they added on the Alloy Wheel Locks as they were on the window sticker $ 81.00 when they sent me the sticker back in June.
 

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Yeah, it's a dealership thing.

For example, we put nitrogen in all of the cars that are delivered here, and wheel locks on them as well.

Unless we've put other accessories (like body side moldings or door edge guards) on the car so there is an actual addendum, we don't bother charging for them, and then it's free nitrogen for life from us if you need it.

We DO have severe temperature fluctuations from hot to cold and back again that a tire with simply air in it will notice. Up north, it's more a case of make sure you actually have air in the tire, because when it gets cold ... and then gets COLDER ... tires notice.
How do you get the old air out? Do you break the bead and flush it with nitrogen or just let some out? Probably not getting a full fill of nitrogen? Also interesting about the delivery status of the vehicle - theft prevention?
 

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We put it in, and it's free Nitrogen for life. But I also specifically tell my customers that if your tire is low - just add air. It's not going to hurt anything. And when you come back in for your next regular service, tell our guys and they'll put Nitrogen back in, no issues.
How do you purge the existing air from the tires before you fill with nitrogen?
 

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How do you purge the existing air from the tires before you fill with nitrogen?
There's a machine in our shop. Hook all four tires up to it at the same time. I have no idea how it actually works, if it just sucks the air that's in there first and then puts nitrogen in it, or what. All I know is that when it's done, they put the green caps on it.
 

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The higher the PSI the better the fuel economy. The Honda Insight runs really high pressures to squeeze every little MPG out. The ride/handling does suffer however. If you want to play with the tire pressures, increase the pressure until the ride suffers too much for your liking, then back off a bit. You can go as high as the tire sidewall max PSI, but I'd stick with the placard on the driver's side door frame.

When I bought my 03 I immediately noticed the ride seemed rougher than reasonable (like cement tires!) and the handling seemed very skittish. In fact, it was almost dangerous on the wet drive home. Once I got home I checked the tire pressure and found the "technicians" at the dealership pumped 'em up to 40+ psi. So much for using THAT dealership ever again!

Once I let them down to the Subaru recommended psi things improved enormously.

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The higher the PSI the better the fuel economy. The Honda Insight runs really high pressures to squeeze every little MPG out. The ride/handling does suffer however. If you want to play with the tire pressures, increase the pressure until the ride suffers too much for your liking, then back off a bit. You can go as high as the tire sidewall max PSI, but I'd stick with the placard on the driver's side door frame.
Alas, with fluctuating temperatures, especially as caused by driving and weather, it is never wise to go as high as the max PSI on the sidewall. Normal driving increases my PSI by 5. The recent weather changes have caused a 5psi change as well.

Inflating to max PSI means that under heavy driving, I become 5psi over max tire PSI.
 

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My warning sounded when I embarked on a trip the other day. Luckily with all the storage space, I have a great portable air inflator and just pulled into a parking lot and aired up all 4 tires... Each was no more than 3 lbs off. The alert went away after about 15 min of driving.

I like that it knew it and corrected so quickly.
 

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Gotta add this.
The maximum tire pressure listed on your sidewall is a “cold” tire pressure. It is meant as a maximum on a tire that has not been further heated by driving. There is plenty of space left to account for normal warming from use.
Start with the recommendation from your vehicle manufacturer. They spent engineering time developing that pressure recommendation. You can typically inflate past that rec and achieve less rolling resistance, but will have to give up something else for it. Generally, with exceptions, the recommendation of the auto manufacturer is what they determined by testing, to give you the best balance of performance, ride and mileage. And what engineer do you have working for you to do the same? Having said all that, I must say I typically run a couple of pounds above the door sticker to get a firmer ride and handling, but I don’t stray very far from what the car manufacturer figured out. 2cents deposited....
 

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I wish the weather here would make up its mind. One day it’s 40° the next day it’s 75. Tire pressure is ranging anywhere from 34 to 38 when I start up
 

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My what an entertaining thread.

What is the correct pressure? Start with what the manufacturer recommends, then adjust as tire wear dictates. Tread depth gauges are cheap and easy to use. Get one. Use it! For my wife's Forester, the pressure on the door sticker results in even tire wear, so that's what we use. On my 2011 Outback, running four psi above the sticker resulted in even tire wear and about 2 MPG better mileage. I haven't figured out the Ascent yet, it only has 8,000 miles on it and most of those are on snow tires.

Personally, I don't care if my tires are filled with nitrogen or air. I check them regularly and adjust as necessary. That's the key, no matter what you use to fill them. If the temperatures are swinging wildly from day to day, I leave them inflated properly for the cold days. It is safer to drive on a SLIGHTLY over inflated tire than an under inflated tire. A slightly over inflated tire is much less likely to hydroplane than an under inflated tire. An over inflated tire will give better fuel mileage than an under inflated tire due to decreased rolling resistance. It will handle like crap, but it will use less fuel. Don't believe me? - go check out the websites for people who drive in fuel economy contests.
 

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Why is it so hard for so many dealers fulfill their requirement and adjust the pressure prior to delivery? I expect my dealer to pay attention to detail - it matters.
 

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I have a new car, 2021 Limited with PSI of 39-41 depending on the day. I contacted the dealer and they said 40 is OK if the pressure was too high a warning light would come on. He said i could bring it in though if i wanted. Dealer is ~35 minutes from my house so would like to avoid that, said i could also bleed them out a bit. Is that PSI level concerning or should it be okay?
 

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If that's measured cold, it's too high for any Ascent OEM tire, and WAY higher than I would run the 20" tires. It will make handling seem "floaty". At normal temperatures for the season, with the tires cold, you should measure them to be what's on the door sticker on your driver's B-pillar, with at most +1 or +2 psi more. You can buy a cheap gauge from any auto parts store that will allow you to lower the pressure and measure. Any tire shop or mechanic can lower them to proper pressure as well.
 
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