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of course my 16 year old had an opinion

This was the first complaint my 16 year old son had when I brought the vehicle home. Maybe someday I will paint them.
 

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2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
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If I ever switch out the wheels, I'll be painting my calipers for sure. Maybe even if I don't. I do like the look of that little splash of color.
 
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If I were to paint it, for protection rather than appearance, I would do it black to keep them hidden. Now, if they're fixed caliper (i.e. brembo or alike), neon or bright colors would be awesome.
@pro10is: Are the calipers made of ferrous (e.g. steel or cast iron) material? So our calipers don't have any protection (i.e. plated or anodized)?
 

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Any problems or lessons learned while taking the calipers off to paint them?
 

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If I were to paint it, for protection rather than appearance, I would do it black to keep them hidden. Now, if they're fixed caliper (i.e. brembo or alike), neon or bright colors would be awesome.

@pro10is: Are the calipers made of ferrous (e.g. steel or cast iron) material? So our calipers don't have any protection (i.e. plated or anodized)?
The calipers are made of cast iron. They do not appear to have any serious protection against corrosion and will probably rust within a couple of years like most calipers.
 

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Any problems or lessons learned while taking the calipers off to paint them?
No problems, but it's best to partially remove them for painting. Simply remove the spring and then pull off the caliper body and remove the brake pads. This only takes a couple of minutes for anyone who is familiar with doing a typical brake pad replacement. Once the calipers are partially removed (no need to disconnect the hydraulic line) you have much easier access for painting. Hang the calipers using something like a wire, do not stress the attached hydraulic line. Keep the pads and rotors free from paint. Follow the directions that came with the caliper paint for more details. They give you a can of brake cleaner which is ideal to prep the calipers.

The special caliper paint is epoxy based so you need to mix it beforehand. Once mixed, it will dry within a couple of hours even if the paint can cover is replaced. There's more than enough to do all four calipers in one can with at least two coats. So I recommend dividing the contents of both the paint and hardener in halves or even forths so that all the paint does not harden before you can finish. You should even have some leftover.

Simply paint the calipers using the brush provided. Use a smaller artist's type brush for the tight areas. Wipe off any overpainted areas or spills before the paint dries. Do not get paint on any rubber parts, moving parts, the springs, or the hydraulic hose. Once dried, it forms a very hard solvent resistant finish which cannot easily be removed.

Use only heat resistant, epoxy based caliper paint, nothing else will last. The paint comes in a multitude of colors to suit anyone's tastes. You can also have calipers powder coated, but this is more difficult because the calipers would need to be dissembled. Finished calipers look great and the paint protects the calipers from failures due to rust issues. Well worth the effort which is about 2-3 hours of time. The Ascent has large, nicely shaped calipers which lend themselves to finishing.
 

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That’s a good kit that OP used and it’s self leveling so it’s a very smooth finish after brushing it on.

Definitely more durable than paint but I found that the calipers on my Mazda I had used this on still had some chips here and there after a few years due to rocks. And I know it’s not prep either because I wire wheeled the entire caliper and got it thoroughly clean.

It looks sharp though it might not hold up too well if you’re taking your Ascent off the hardball.
 

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Has anyone else done any caliper painting?
I'm leaning toward this kit. 30k mile brake fluid flush is coming up so I'm going to do it all at the same time.
 

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It's easy, there are several types of products. I would recommend one of the heavier, brush-on/epoxy type products. Very durable. I have always disconnected them from the brake lines and pulled them off the car. But they can be done on the car, with some creative hangers. The epoxys help with drytime for on the car painting.
 

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Has anyone else done any caliper painting?
I'm leaning toward this kit. 30k mile brake fluid flush is coming up so I'm going to do it all at the same time.
That's the exact same kit I referenced above, just in yellow. It's the best kit available that I know of. It's less expensive at Tire Rack.

It works very well, mine still look like new.

Here are some tips:
Plan two days for this. You'll need at least two coats and the paint needs to dry overnight before you can put on the second coat.

Clean all surfaces as best as possible before painting. There can be no dust, dirt, salt, oil, rust, or grease.

Use only half the can and half the hardener for the first coat. If you use the full can, the paint will harden before you get a chance to do the second coat and you'll need to buy another kit. Half a can will cover all four rotors with some left over. Use all the paint once you add hardener, it won't be useable the next day. Go over the rotors again if you have paint left from the first half of a can, it'll still even out, but for two effective coats, the first coat must dry.

Wear rubber gloves and have paint solvent and rags on hand to remove any slip-ups.

Don't use the cheap acid brush that comes with the kit, use decent quality paintbrushes meant for oil-based paints. Get at least 2 half-inch ones and 2 small detail brushes for the tight areas. You can find these at Walmart in the arts and crafts section. Don't try to clean the brushes afterward, the epoxy paint won't come off. Save yourself the trouble and just toss them when you're done, they don't cost much and it's not worth your time.

You do not have to remove the calipers' hydraulic lines, but you should remove the pads and brackets, otherwise, it'll be quite a bit harder to do. Removing the pads and brackets is not hard and takes little extra time. You'll get much better results.

After you paint the calipers and brackets, inspect them carefully, it's very easy to miss spots, and once the paint dries you can't use it again because of the hardener. Be sure to have good lighting. Those LED headlamps are perfect.

Find a way to hang the calipers and brackets to dry before you start. It's messy if you try to devise a way to hang them when they're wet.

If you have any other questions just let me know.
 

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Thank you @pro10is
Having enough paint for two coats without mixing the whole batch was one of my biggest concerns. I wouldn’t have even thought to look for it on tire rack
Update: I found an even better price on stage3motorsports.com plus used a coupon code!
 

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I got my kit in the mail eventually and started on the calipers today. I’ll post a couple pics and progress until it’s finished.

Things I’ve noted so far:
  • Release your parking brake before unplugging the solenoid at the rear calipers! I don’t recommend starting your vehicle, buckling up, foot on brake, etc while on jack stands like I ended up doing.
  • The rubber portion of the brake line isn’t easily crimped so I used a clamp to seal off the banjo bolt and keep it up until I replace the calipers.
  • Wire wheel, wire brush and a lot of brake cleaner. When you think it’s clean, repeat
  • I purchased one kit. I only removed the rear calipers and this kit will only have enough to finish these two calipers. I’m going to purchase another kit for the front to do separately. I chose yellow so that may have something to do with requiring more coats
  • I mixed half the paint with half the hardener and that was enough to do 2 coats on the 2 calipers I’m working. The paint gets tacky after 30-45 minutes and tends to pull off the uncured first coat rather than adding a proper 2nd coat. Tomorrow I’ll mix the other half and put on another coat or two
  • As recommended I didn’t even try the brush that came with the kit. I had a couple decent brushes laying around. One medium size brush and one small one was helpful to have ready.
  • Holding the caliper or bracket in one hand while painting isn’t as easy as it seems. Have somewhere ready to lay them down. The calipers sit nicely on the ebrake solenoid to dry
  • Wear gloves! That paint doesn’t come off skin easily!
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I wouldn't recommend removing the calipers to most people because they can be painted with the hydraulic lines attached (albeit not as easily) and removing them necessitates carefully and properly bleeding all four afterward, but if you're comfortable with that, then that's ok.

Pinching or crimping a rubber brake line is risky because it could damage the interior lining. When damaged internally, they'd been known to have a piece flake off and then clog the brake line. The way you clamped the banjos rather the crimping the lines is clever. However, I'd recommend replacing the copper crush washers because they conform to the surface they're crushed against and are designed to work only once. You'll also need to torque the banjo bolts to spec or have enough experience to know how to tighten them just enough without under or overtightening them. This is critical and not something people without good automotive repair skills should mess with since the brakes are obviously critical. But again, you know your own comfort level and I'm just cautioning anyone else who might attempt this.

It looks like they're going to come out great. For a finishing touch, you can order Subaru decals to make them look even better.
 

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Looking forward to finished pics.

LOL I remember doing this (fluorescent green) on my Cherry Red VW VR6 Corrado in the mid 90s. Brings back memories.
I was a wee lad!
 

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For a finishing touch, you can order Subaru decals to make them look even better.
Insight is much appreciated. I was already thinking about some Subaru decals on them so thanks for that link!
114130151 is the part number for the crush ring. I ordered 8 ahead of time. They look like aluminum rather than copper when I took the old ones off (new ones arrive today). I felt like removing them is the best option to get them very clean. But, I’m comfortable working on brakes.
3rd coat goes on today when it stops raining!
 
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