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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Beach driving has been talked about a lot. We've had an oversand pass for the last 10 years in the Cape Cod National Seashore for our Jeeps. I learned to love the beach when I lived there, would even go out just for a lunch break and taught my daughter to drive stick on the sand!

But this year we didn't bring the Jeep, we brought the Ascent and we really missed going out there. So what's the fuss? I'm concerned about many things. First, the access road just have soft dry sand, rutted soft dry sand, and hills. They are two way roads with pulls off when you meet oncoming traffic, except for one section where one of you is going to have to back up! And there there are the hills. I'm concerned about the breakover angle at the top of the hill. Getting stuck out there would really suck.

Here's a video to show you the typical road conditions.


Can the stock 20" handle 10psi? That's the pressure the National Seashore asks you to use. I'm real squeamish about that with the 20" rims, there's so little sidewall. I'm trying to convince myself to get the 18" and that should be much better. We're going to get some Wildpeaks before winter so I'd like to get this settled now, rather than have to do it twice, that's a real waste of money.

Lifting it is pretty much out of the question.

Traction mats are great if you're stuck once, but what if you get stuck every 50 feet? That would get old fast.
 

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I wouldn't deflate the stock 20" tires to 10 psi. No less than 17 psi (and I don't even like that idea because of the thin sidewalls). I don't particularly see anything my Ascent couldn't handle there, but elevations and breakover angles don't come out well on videos, due to the horizontal stretch.

If you plan on doing that regularly, consider getting 17" wheels (there's only four known ones to choose from) and Falken's Wildpeak AT3W series (or someone else's comparable tire). Air that down to no more than 50% of how much air it needs on the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your feedback. You do confirm that 10psi is way too low for the 20s. It is unlikely we'd go with the 17s, factory 18s are very possible but that would mostly be for rough VT and NH back road exploration. The 20s really give jolts on those roads. If we did get a sand pass we'd only use it once a twice a year. But, we'll also need a same size spare so pulling the trigger has financial consequences.

I didn't expect an easy answer but I had to ask. Thanks again for your feedback.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
See the first photo on Off roading... again. ?

If the hidden from view descent was the same as the ascent then that photo shows a worse situation than we'd find on sand. Of course there the ground is hard so you have some advantages. Then again, a soft breakover can give some.

Choices...
 

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Solid all terrains (Kumho, Falken, Toyo, etc) should do fine on stock 18" rims, aired down at least 50%. I've done some sand dunes, all without issue, but didn't have a camera person to capture it. As for that pic, the breakover angle and approach/departure angles, weren't really issues. If there was a trail beyond that point, I could have continued, but, it's actually a drop off, and I am sitting at the very edge. Right off the right side of this image is... well, nothing. A drop into the valley.
5493


This is probably the most similar of what I've gotten on video of my adventures... this sand is soft enough that the Jeep owners who didn't know about airing down, were getting stuck and needed to be towed out.

I did that sand pit a few times, including stopping and starting in the middle of it, with no issues. You can see the elevation changes on the bottom left.
 
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