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Had my Ascent in for the 6000 mile service. The dealer performed a battery test that measured only 214 CCA, OEM Reference is 530 CCA. Anyone else seeing results like this one?
 

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Had my Ascent in for the 6000 mile service. The dealer performed a battery test that measured only 214 CCA, OEM Reference is 530 CCA. Anyone else seeing results like this one?



I presume they warrantied the battery?
 

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A search will reveal quite a few threads on subaruoutback.org from owners who found the factory batteries on their Gen 4 & 5 Outbacks to be failure prone and weak. I was one of them. I'm betting that the cold weather and the passage of time will bring on the battery failure posts in this forum too. IIRC the Ascent factory battery has just a smidge more CCA than what they put in the OB.

The preferred upgrade is a Group 34 with the highest CCA or reserve capacity available, whichever your preference. Group 24 is bigger and fits better, but generally has a little less CCA/reserve.There is much debate about brands and types.

If I had an Ascent (not quite there yet) I'd be very inclined to cut to the chase and install a higher capacity aftermarket battery, instead of waiting for the factory weak-knees unit to fail in 2+ years, as they have done for me twice in an Outback (the original, and the OE warranty replacement). 2 bad Subaru can't get their act together on this.
 

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I’m taking my Ascent in today for a battery check. I’ve tested it and the lowest I have seen is 12.3 volts. It’s had some rough starts and with the temps dropping, there is no doubt in my mind that it will leave me stranded if not replaced.
 

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Had my Ascent in for the 6000 mile service. The dealer performed a battery test that measured only 214 CCA, OEM Reference is 530 CCA. Anyone else seeing results like this one?

Both my '15 Outback and my new Ascent had battery problems up front. Both were replaced. The Outback replacement was still running at 2.75 years when I traded it for the Ascent.
 

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There are a few of us who got the factory battery replaced. Mine was replaced at 2,000 miles.

Mine had a bad cell in it and was only showing 10.5 volts when the engine was off. I full battery should show about 12.6 anything below 12 means your battery is practically dead.

A dead cell will cause longer cranks because the battery has less Cold crank Amps. Most have gotten their battery replaced with the retail version with a Blue Subaru sticker on it.
 

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Had my Ascent in for the 6000 mile service. The dealer performed a battery test that measured only 214 CCA, OEM Reference is 530 CCA. Anyone else seeing results like this one?
What was their recommendation?

The starter I've seen on 4-6cyl DOHC (or SOHC) uses 1,500W starter. Ultimately, the minimum cranking amp your starter requires is about 125A; another word, your battery has 1.7 times the capacity. Keep note of this for your future decisions.
 

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I had rough starts couple of times and it's not consistent. Thought this could be related to the operation that consumes more battery amps after engine shut-off...like head lights ON for few mins or apply parking brakes or use tail gate. But I couldn't replicate the issue.

Also, anyone used battery warmer or engine block warmer in ascents?
 

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Subaru really ought to upgrade the batteries they put in their vehicles. It's difficult for Ambassadors to keep a straight face when consumers ask them how long the batteries last on Subarus.

I looked at three or four pre-owned 2017-2018 Outbacks before I purchased one, and they ALL had battery corrosion that had seeped onto the mounting bracket. Both of our WRX's (2015 and 2016) required replacement batteries within 18 months of being purchased new off the lot.
 

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I believe that the vehicle self tests are draining the battery. Often I walk past my car in the driveway and I hear whirring from the rear or the front. I know that these are part of the car's systems checks but I've never heard it this often before from any of my other cars. If your setting for auto update is on, then that means the car os actively using wifi and pinging the software server at regular intervals to check. Given that the stock battery is possibly already weak, these two functions alone will kill your battery power,
 

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Subaru really ought to upgrade the batteries they put in their vehicles. It's difficult for Ambassadors to keep a straight face when consumers ask them how long the batteries last on Subarus.

I looked at three or four pre-owned 2017-2018 Outbacks before I purchased one, and they ALL had battery corrosion that had seeped onto the mounting bracket. Both of our WRX's (2015 and 2016) required replacement batteries within 18 months of being purchased new off the lot.
Our August 2016 built Forester (non-turbo limited) will need another battery soon, can't leave the domelight on for more than 2hrs. I'm not sure where SOJ sourced their battery but the one we got is sure as heck worst than Autozone or Walmart batteries, and I bought and warranty/prorated a lot of batteries over the decades.
 

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I believe that the vehicle self tests are draining the battery. Often I walk past my car in the driveway and I hear whirring from the rear or the front. I know that these are part of the car's systems checks but I've never heard it this often before from any of my other cars. If your setting for auto update is on, then that means the car os actively using wifi and pinging the software server at regular intervals to check. Given that the stock battery is possibly already weak, these two functions alone will kill your battery power,

The emissions item that you hear "whirring" happens on many newer vehicles, but I do agree that with all the electronics on new vehicles, it would be great if OEM batteries were better, maybe set the vehicle up for AGM batteries that can handle more drain and higher output alternators as stock equipment rather than people having to do it aftermarket.
 
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OEM batteries seem to be a problem with a lot of manufacturers unfortunately. Glad they are not the sealed/maintenance free type which are a particular issue in Phoenix where heat evaporates or alters the electrolyte and the battery just dies with no warning. At least we can keep an eye on the water levels in these, but I'm going with my own battery at the first sign of weakness. Warranty is great if its a battery upgrade if not...
 
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