Subaru Ascent Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the base stereo - no HK, no Rockford Fosgate, just the 6 speakers. They sound very average. I can tell the highs and lows are rolled off pretty severely. There is no definition to the sound. Instruments are indistinct. It's just a blob of noise. The best thing I can say about the system is it is inoffensive. But it is maddening in its lack of detail, definition and articulation.

Using Crutchfield as a guide it seems we have a lot of options for speakers. I originally planned on replacing the front door speakers with Focal K2 Power 165KRC 6.5" coaxials.https://www.crutchfield.com/p_091165KRC/Focal-K2-Power-165KRC.html

Thinking about it, I don't generally like metal dome tweeters as they tend to be very bright. My home speakers are Bohlender Graebner planars (like Martin Logans). Whenever I demo metal dome tweeters, most of them drive me out of the room.

So I may go with the Morel Temp Ultra 692 Integra 6x9 speakers instead. These have bigger magnets so the midbass would be better. And the silk dome tweeters are no doubt much smoother than any metal tweeter could be. https://www.crutchfield.com/p_210TU692IN/Morel-Tempo-Ultra-692-Integra.html

The rear doors can make to with a much less expensive speaker.

The biggest part of the project is to build a custom subwoofer box in the rear storage compartment. Actually, I would remove the storage tray. That tray is barely 11" front to back, and at the most, 5.5" tall. But the deepest part of the tray slopes inward, so there's probably a bit less room than that. If I use 3/4" MDF to build the box, that very little depth for a shallow sub and a not very big one at that. Furthermore the volume of the box would be minuscule.

So I pulled the tray off today and took some measurements. There's a LOT more room without the tray! It's about 29" wide before the pipe-like obstructions, and 18"+ front to back. Depth is 6 1/4".

I figure I can build a nice box to fit the space. A 29 x 18 x 6 1/4" box would have about 1.377 cu ft internally. That's more than enough for the typical shallow mount 12" subwoofer driver. As for the driver itself, there are a TON to choose from. JL Audio is the most well know and definitely quality but the best shallow mount they make is over $600. That's a bit pricey. Kenwood makes a nice 12" sub driver: https://www.crutchfield.com/p_113XW1200/Kenwood-Excelon-KFC-XW1200F.html

There are other shallow mount subs like this: https://www.woofersetc.com/c-23-subwoofers/c-120-shallow-mount-subwoofers/sd-3-12-d4-sundown-audio-12-500w-rms-dual-4-ohm-sd-series-subwoofer.html

The floor of the storage compartment already has some glued on pads of some sort. I figure they're there to dampen vibrations. I plan on using a Dynamat clone and lining the compartment, leaving cutouts for where the rubber grommets are on the floor of the compartment.

Also the compartment floor is not perfectly flat. It slopes downward at the very rearmost part of the compartment. To keep the sub box level and to help with isolation so I don't get the typical rice rocket boom buzz, I'll use some sorbothane isolation pads cut down to the appropriate size.

Here's a quick mockup sketch:


The plan is to have all of this sitting under the storage compartment cover. As for the cover itself, it appears to be made of a very stiff material. I'm not sure if it's plastic or some other material. It might e a good idea to remove the carpet-like material and drill some holes to allow the sub to vent. I can recover the lid with a more friendly acoustic material.


Obviously I need to figure a way of removing the equalization from the head unit signal. I'm hoping that the EQ is added by the factory amp. Remove the amp, run the head unit outputs a DSP unit to clean up the signal and align the timing. Here I'm not sure what unit to use. JL Audio has the FIX-86:FiX-86 - Car Audio - Processors - OEM Integration - JL Audio

The advantage of the JL unit is if you pair it with one of the JL amps, everything is handled via the digital port with the FIX, no analog handshakes.

There are a ton of other DSP units out there. Some require a LOT of tuning work. Some like the JL unit, do it automatically. I'm leaning towards the automated approach. I've had excellent results in home theater using room correction software in the processor, so I'm comfortable with letting the DSP do its thing.

So that's the rudimentary plan. I'm going to head on over to the car audio forums and see if I'm headed in the wrong direction. Any comments are welcome!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Keep us updated! At the least, I'm interested in upgrading the speakers. I'm not the guy that likes the loudest speakers or the car with the most bass, but I do like clear, good-sounding music.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
I don't think the biggest part of the project will be to build a custom subwoofer box in the rear storage compartment. You don't really even need to do that, you can simply use an external subwoofer enclosure. I did that for years on my Forester. I would simply remove it whenever I needed to load something large. Even if you want to build the custom box, that's still not even close to the biggest challenge.

The biggest challenge you face is retrofitting the existing factory head unit to external aftermarket amplifiers. This is the big challenge to everyone these days now that factory infotainment systems are so highly integrated that they can no longer be swapped out with an aftermarket head unit. Only until you conquer that, does the rest become doable.

You'll first need to dig into the factory wiring to see if it's possible to capture preamp outputs. Since the Rockford Fosgate option exists, this may be a possibility. If it is possible, then you probably only need to add external amps for the speakers and subwoofer. If not, then you'll have to go with the existing speaker-level outputs and feed them into a special DSP like the FiX-86 you mentioned to eliminate the factory system's equalization, crossover filtering, and time alignments. Only then can you get a decent flat signal for your external amps. Then you'll need to add your own equalization because you won't be satisfied with a totally flat output, no one ever is. You can also use the FiX-86 to add your own equalization, which is a great feature, but this will require a laptop running TüN Software via USB which is not great for on the fly adjustments.

Then you're going to need to find places to mount all the massive electronics, provide very heavy gauge power wiring directly from the battery to both amplifiers, and deal with all the interconnects. Then you're ready to mount the new speakers. I've done this many times, and it's a major project. It's going to cost you well over $1,000 to do it right, and it'll require many day's if not a week's worth of hard work tearing into the Ascent.

I'm not trying to discourage you, in fact, I'd love to see someone do the groundwork and prove it can be successfully done on an Ascent. But if you do undertake it, it'll be a major time and $$$$ commitment that you'll need to plan carefully, well in advance to get the results you want.

You could simply go with the Rockford Fosgate option. That would give you a decent primary amp. You could then choose your own speakers. The big challenge would still be to add a subwoofer amp and speaker since there is no provision for that, and any audio upgrade without a subwoofer is not going to be great.

So this is a considerable challenge and I applaud you for having the intestinal fortitude to even consider it. This time around I wimped out and simply went with the Harman Kardon upgrade which is decent but falls considerably short of being a true audiophile worthy system, especially with no equalizer. I'll have to live with that, but at least I didn't have to once again endure the pain of rigging in another aftermarket system.

Best of luck with this. Please keep us updated, your experiences should prove very valuable to many here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
926 Posts
So this is a considerable challenge and I applaud you for having the intestinal fortitude to even consider it. This time around I wimped out and simply went with the Harman Kardon upgrade which is decent but falls considerably short of being a true audiophile worthy system, especially with no equalizer. I'll have to live with that, but at least I didn't have to once again endure the pain of rigging in another aftermarket system.

Best of luck with this. Please keep us updated, your experiences should prove very valuable to many here.
I too wimped out and just did the Rockford Fosgate system. Still missing a subwoofer and the sound is just "good enough" but like you mentioned I didn't want to go digging around in the door panels/dash, etc when it is so integrated and with so many airbags to dodge too!

Keep us updated..... curious how it turns out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks all for the replies. Someone here posted up how to get to the head unit and behind the passenger side dash. I'm hoping to run the wiring on the floor along the threshold from front to back.

The amp is going to sit in the rear compartment on the floor next to the sub.

I do wonder if I need one of those big capacitors since the stock wiring and amperage may be inadequate.

Yes, it's going to be a lot of work. I'm using this vehicle to practice on before I upgrade the system in my truck. That one is going to be a monster project lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
Thanks all for the replies. Someone here posted up how to get to the head unit and behind the passenger side dash. I'm hoping to run the wiring on the floor along the threshold from front to back.

The amp is going to sit in the rear compartment on the floor next to the sub.

I do wonder if I need one of those big capacitors since the stock wiring and amperage may be inadequate.

Yes, it's going to be a lot of work. I'm using this vehicle to practice on before I upgrade the system in my truck. That one is going to be a monster project lol.
You're going to practice on a new $33K+ Ascent? Wow, your truck must really be something.

You can't (shouldn't) use stock power wiring to power external amplifiers. Where are you going to find an existing power wire that can handle that much additional power? You're going to need very heavy gauge power wiring that can handle the full amperage requirements of whatever external amplifier(s) you select. This is typically around 30 amps per amplifier but could be as high as 50 amps. You're going to need something like this to run a power line directly to the battery.

The Ascent, with all of its seat heaters, defrost systems, adjustable seats, and other power hungry items has a powerful enough alternator, so as long as you run heavy gauge wiring directly to the battery, you should have no issues with enough power for your external amplifier(s), and unless you chose a monster of an amp, you shouldn't require a capacitor, although it never hurts to add one (except to your wallet, lol).

How many channels is your primary amplifier and what's the power rating? Are you running a separate amplifier for the subwoofer or choosing an amplifier that can handle all channels including the subwoofer?

Have you figured out yet if you can tap into preamp outputs of the head unit or are you planning to use the speaker level outputs? So many unanswered questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I need 4 gauge wiring? I'm really surprised because I run 12 gauge wiring in my home theater system. I have an ATI multichannel amp that puts out 150 watts/channel. The thing is over 75 lbs! I have dedicated 20 amp circuits in my theater.

I figure the car amp shouldn't need more than 50-75 watts/ch to the door speakers. Most of the ones I'm looking at are fairly efficient, rated in the 90 + db at 1watt/1meter.

It's the subwoofer that will need 200-500 watts. So I could either go with something like the JL VX 600/61 that puts out 100 w/ch x 6. I could bridge 2 of the channels to drive the sub. The HELIX P SIX DSP MK2 also comes well recommended. But those are pricey amps. I'd love to find something for less $$.

From what I've read, it's the amplifier that adds the EQ. I don't know what the output voltage of the head unit is. I know there are solutions for that if the voltage is too low or too high.

Yes, this is my "practice" system. My F450 has a large multi-speaker OEM system. I plan on using FORSCAN to flatten out the head unit EQ, and installing a subwoofer behind the rear seat. Fortunately the truck has dual alternators that puts out over 400 amps :grin:

You're right though. I need to do a LOT more research before embarking on this project. That's why I'm asking questions now.

I do have quite a bit of experience building speaker boxes. I'm building 15 speakers for my home theater right now.




You're going to practice on a new $33K+ Ascent? Wow, your truck must really be something.

You can't (shouldn't) use stock power wiring to power external amplifiers. Where are you going to find an existing power wire that can handle that much additional power? You're going to need very heavy gauge power wiring that can handle the full amperage requirements of whatever external amplifier(s) you select. This is typically around 30 amps per amplifier but could be as high as 50 amps. You're going to need something like this to run a power line directly to the battery.

The Ascent, with all of its seat heaters, defrost systems, adjustable seats, and other power hungry items has a powerful enough alternator, so as long as you run heavy gauge wiring directly to the battery, you should have no issues with enough power for your external amplifier(s), and unless you chose a monster of an amp, you shouldn't require a capacitor, although it never hurts to add one (except to your wallet, lol).

How many channels is your primary amplifier and what's the power rating? Are you running a separate amplifier for the subwoofer or choosing an amplifier that can handle all channels including the subwoofer?

Have you figured out yet if you can tap into preamp outputs of the head unit or are you planning to use the speaker level outputs? So many unanswered questions.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,090 Posts
ZERO or 00 gauge for what you're describing.

The power required by such amps requires higher gauge wiring. I use 0 or 00 gauge for power, especially over those distances. DC power requires much thicker wire over distance than AC (if this were an AC powered amp, 12g would be more than sufficient). AC current, because of the nature of AC, requires smaller gauge and has less resistive loss.

There's a reason why home DC power delivery (from the past, when Con Ed was pushing it) required all sorts of thick wires, big copper buses and substations, and was plagued with issues.

Con Edison ends 125 years of an electricity service that began ... direct current electricity was the dominant system in New York City ... The transmission of DC incurs much larger power losses than the transmission of AC.
You can do the math yourself here:
https://www.crutchfield.com/S-DHLt7lEmCHO/learn/learningcenter/car/cable_gauge_chart.html

Alas, you will note that you should be using 1/0 or 2/0 (0 gauge or 00 gauge) wire for the distance and wattage you're considering. :sad:

Melty wires right next to the gas tank hoses isn't something I'd decide upon doing. :tango_face_wink: :sad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
926 Posts
Or to show it in the extreme the other way, the high voltage power lines that get power to your city use 155,000 to 700,000 volts to reduce heat, wire size and power losses. As the voltage goes up, the resistance goes down. Going the other way down to 12V means the resistance has gone up, which increases heat and loss.

On a 110V system, a 12 gauge extension cord is pretty beefy, even up to 100'. On a 12V system, 4 gauge starts getting too small over 12' (depending on amps).

Don't skimp on the power delivery unless you have a small amp!

That's also why it's cheaper/easier to put an amp under the front seat. The main power run is much shorter and then the lines to the speakers can be smaller gauge like 12gauge.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Robert.Mauro

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
I need 4 gauge wiring? I'm really surprised because I run 12 gauge wiring in my home theater system. I have an ATI multichannel amp that puts out 150 watts/channel. The thing is over 75 lbs! I have dedicated 20 amp circuits in my theater.

I figure the car amp shouldn't need more than 50-75 watts/ch to the door speakers. Most of the ones I'm looking at are fairly efficient, rated in the 90 + db at 1watt/1meter.

It's the subwoofer that will need 200-500 watts. So I could either go with something like the JL VX 600/61 that puts out 100 w/ch x 6. I could bridge 2 of the channels to drive the sub. The HELIX P SIX DSP MK2 also comes well recommended. But those are pricey amps. I'd love to find something for less $$.

From what I've read, it's the amplifier that adds the EQ. I don't know what the output voltage of the head unit is. I know there are solutions for that if the voltage is too low or too high.

Yes, this is my "practice" system. My F450 has a large multi-speaker OEM system. I plan on using FORSCAN to flatten out the head unit EQ, and installing a subwoofer behind the rear seat. Fortunately the truck has dual alternators that puts out over 400 amps :grin:

You're right though. I need to do a LOT more research before embarking on this project. That's why I'm asking questions now.

I do have quite a bit of experience building speaker boxes. I'm building 15 speakers for my home theater right now.
Yep, Robert has the right answer. The lower the voltage (AC or DC) the more current (amperage) you will need to provide the same power. Power = Volts * Amps. Wire gauge is determined by its ampacity which is the maximum current that a conductor can carry continuously under the conditions of use without exceeding its temperature rating. The more current (amps) required, the thicker the wire needs to be. Then you need to worry about things like wire length and conductor composition. Longer wires build up resistance and need to be thicker, and aluminum is not as good a conductor as copper so if you used that or impure copper, the wire would need to be thicker still. Suffice to say you need to plan to run very heavy gauge wire directly from the battery to your amplifier(s). The Crutchfield chart Robert provided will help you determine exactly what size you'll need once you know the length and exactly what amperage your amplifiers require.

Amplifiers generally do not provide equalization (other than a basic punch control) unless they contain a DSP, and these are relatively rare and kind of limit your selection, but you can add an equalizer/signal processor. Nowadays you can control many of them via Bluetooth from your smartphone which is awesome.

The amplifiers mostly accept either preamp or speaker level inputs, but it would sure be great if you could get preamp level outputs from the Ascent head unit. This may be possible because I don't think the Rockford Fosgate option uses speaker level inputs, so they must get the preamp outputs from somewhere. You should look very closely into that. You hit the nail on the head when you mentioned in your first post about the concerns to remove the head unit equalization which will be adjusted for the cheap factory speakers. That would be my concern if I had to use the speaker level outputs. The FiX-86 would take care of that, but at the expense of adding yet another electronics unit.

I wish I or someone here could help more, but you may be the first to add aftermarket amps and speakers to the Ascent. It's always tough to be the first.

Best of luck and please let us know if you need any help with anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Update:

I posted on one of the car audio forums and got a good recommendation. Someone with a Crosstek did a system upgrade. The used Audio Frog GS690 6x9 woofers in the front doors and Audiofrog GB15 3.5" tweeters in the dash.

The crossover and DSP were handled by a Helix P Six amplifier/DSP. It's a 6-channel car amplifier with digital signal processing, 120 watts RMS x 6 at 4 ohms (230 watts RMS x 4 at 2 ohms), and DSP adjustments and settings are made via computer (Windows only) or optional remote control.

The Helix uses Burr Brown D/A and A/D converters, which are found in the nicer home theater processors. They produce better sound than the typical el cheapo DA converters.

The Audi Frogs are expensive - tweeters and woofers are $299 and $399 respectively, but they appear to be very high quality. The Helix would save me the hassle of having multiple components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
As the voltage goes up, the resistance goes down.
Actually the resistance does not change at all. Ohm's law is pretty basic; E/(I*R) volts over current times resistance and I*E=P (current times voltage equals watts)

So, if you have a requirement for 600 watts of power, with a 12 volt electrical system, then the current demand is 50 amps (50*12=600)

Copper wire has a resistance per foot at a specific temperature (when wire gets hotter the resistance goes up some, but we won't go in to that). For example;

25 feet of 12 gauge wire has a resistance of 0.04 ohms
25 feet of 8 gauge wire has a resistance of 0.016 ohms
25 feet of 2 gauge wire has a resistance of 0.004 ohms

What hurts you with current draw through wire is the resistive losses cause voltage drop. This is known as I^R (current squared times resistance). At 50 amps the voltage would drop at the amplifier end of the wire. For example;

25 feet of 12 gauge wire has a voltage drop of 3.97 volts. Meaning that the amp only gets 8.03 volts
25 feet of 8 gauge wire has a voltage drop of 1.57 volts. Meaning that the amp only gets 10.43 volts
25 feet of 2 gauge wire has a voltage drop of 0.39 volts. Meaning that the amp only gets 11.61 volts

Now to introduce some practical engineering knowledge in to how current is calculated; On amplifiers the current drain is not constant at the highest rating. While you "could" put a giant wire in there to handle a continual 50 amps it really is not necessary. Even with hard-pounding bass the peak current is only happening 20-30% of the time. That is where super-capacitors located at the amp come in handy. The capacitor can handle the peak current demands of the amp but the wire only needs to supply the average current. (probably closer to 20-25 amps).

If you want to play around with wire gauges, resistance losses and voltage drops here is a nice little calculator;

https://www.calculator.net/voltage-...nce=25&distanceunit=feet&amperes=50&x=74&y=25

Trying to fish a "double aught" (00 gauge) wire from the front to the back is going to be a real PITA. You will find it easier to pull in a 4 or 6 gauge wire and to put a super-capacitor near the amplifier to handle the peak current.

(BTW, I am an electrical engineer, we do these sorts of calculations all the time)
Tisha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I’m not experienced in any of this. Im not going to install speakers, etc on my own - Id have a store do it. Anyway, my main speaker concern is clear, good-sounding music (not the loudest or with the most bass). I’m not an audiophile by any means but I do like good-sounding music.

As far as price, what is my best option? The base 6 speaker and then upgrading speakers at a later date? RF?

As far as value, what is the best option?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,090 Posts
I’m not experienced in any of this. Im not going to install speakers, etc on my own - Id have a store do it. Anyway, my main speaker concern is clear, good-sounding music (not the loudest or with the most bass). I’m not an audiophile by any means but I do like good-sounding music.

As far as price, what is my best option? The base 6 speaker and then upgrading speakers at a later date? RF?

As far as value, what is the best option?
I am utterly thrilled with the HK 14 speaker setup. Others are quite happy with the RF upgrade. Since you don't have a desire for crazy bass, the RF upgrade is probably more than enough, but, look at the accessories packages before deciding. You may find one that has other things you want, that's the right price that includes the HK unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
I’m not experienced in any of this. Im not going to install speakers, etc on my own - Id have a store do it. Anyway, my main speaker concern is clear, good-sounding music (not the loudest or with the most bass). I’m not an audiophile by any means but I do like good-sounding music.

As far as price, what is my best option? The base 6 speaker and then upgrading speakers at a later date? RF?

As far as value, what is the best option?
I agree with Robert, the Harman Kardon option is absolutely the best choice for anyone buying an Ascent if they want the best sound possible without dealing with the expense and bother of installing aftermarket components. When you add in the cost of the aftermarket components required to even begin to meet the performance of the HK system, you'll see it's actually a very good deal to get an option package with the HK system. Equivalent or better aftermarket components will cost well over $1,000 upwards to $2,000, and it'll take another $200-$500 to have someone install it if you didn't want to attempt it.

If you've already purchased an Ascent and did not get the HK option, then going with the Rockford Fosgate option would be your next practical choice. You could also upgrade speakers in addition to the ones you get with Rockford Fosgate option if you wanted to go further.

Neither of these options gets you mega-bass. If you must have that, then get the HK option and add a single-channel amplifier and a larger, more powerful external subwoofer using the speaker level outputs from the existing HK subwoofer. This is doable without too much effort and expense.

If you're an audiophile and require the absolute best sound system possible, then you should be willing to do whatever is necessary for expense and effort, but the Ascent factory setup will be challenging because you cannot eliminate the head unit. However, with enough time and money, anything is possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The HK system will get you decent sound, not great sound. I’ve never heard an OEM automobile sound system that sounded all that great. Yes I’m picky. The Ascent being so quiet inside, makes it all that more obvious.

I’m sure many folks could live with the HK or RF system. But if you’ve ever heard a good aftermarket system, you’d realize there is a very significant difference.

It’s no different than any other aftermarket parts we like to swap out - wheels/tires, suspension, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I’m not experienced in any of this. Im not going to install speakers, etc on my own - Id have a store do it. Anyway, my main speaker concern is clear, good-sounding music (not the loudest or with the most bass). I’m not an audiophile by any means but I do like good-sounding music.

As far as price, what is my best option? The base 6 speaker and then upgrading speakers at a later date? RF?

As far as value, what is the best option?
The RF upgrade would be the simplest path for you. You can also add a self powered small subwoofer that fits in the rear storage compartment under the lid. No one will know it’s back there.

Alternatively you could have a shop install a component system with a 6x9 woofer in the door and a tweeter in the dash, all running off a smallish amp. The cost would be just slightly more than the RF approach, but the quality of the components and the sound would be markedly better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Ok you and Robert have convinced me that I need a much heavier gauge of wiring!

Does that also mean that I can not use the factory wiring from the head unit to the speakers? Do I have to swap out all the wiring?

Actually the resistance does not change at all. Ohm's law is pretty basic; E/(I*R) volts over current times resistance and I*E=P (current times voltage equals watts)

So, if you have a requirement for 600 watts of power, with a 12 volt electrical system, then the current demand is 50 amps (50*12=600)

Copper wire has a resistance per foot at a specific temperature (when wire gets hotter the resistance goes up some, but we won't go in to that). For example;

25 feet of 12 gauge wire has a resistance of 0.04 ohms
25 feet of 8 gauge wire has a resistance of 0.016 ohms
25 feet of 2 gauge wire has a resistance of 0.004 ohms

What hurts you with current draw through wire is the resistive losses cause voltage drop. This is known as I^R (current squared times resistance). At 50 amps the voltage would drop at the amplifier end of the wire. For example;

25 feet of 12 gauge wire has a voltage drop of 3.97 volts. Meaning that the amp only gets 8.03 volts
25 feet of 8 gauge wire has a voltage drop of 1.57 volts. Meaning that the amp only gets 10.43 volts
25 feet of 2 gauge wire has a voltage drop of 0.39 volts. Meaning that the amp only gets 11.61 volts

Now to introduce some practical engineering knowledge in to how current is calculated; On amplifiers the current drain is not constant at the highest rating. While you "could" put a giant wire in there to handle a continual 50 amps it really is not necessary. Even with hard-pounding bass the peak current is only happening 20-30% of the time. That is where super-capacitors located at the amp come in handy. The capacitor can handle the peak current demands of the amp but the wire only needs to supply the average current. (probably closer to 20-25 amps).

If you want to play around with wire gauges, resistance losses and voltage drops here is a nice little calculator;

https://www.calculator.net/voltage-...nce=25&distanceunit=feet&amperes=50&x=74&y=25

Trying to fish a "double aught" (00 gauge) wire from the front to the back is going to be a real PITA. You will find it easier to pull in a 4 or 6 gauge wire and to put a super-capacitor near the amplifier to handle the peak current.

(BTW, I am an electrical engineer, we do these sorts of calculations all the time)
Tisha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
The HK system will get you decent sound, not great sound. I’ve never heard an OEM automobile sound system that sounded all that great. Yes I’m picky. The Ascent being so quiet inside, makes it all that more obvious.

I’m sure many folks could live with the HK or RF system. But if you’ve ever heard a good aftermarket system, you’d realize there is a very significant difference.

It’s no different than any other aftermarket parts we like to swap out - wheels/tires, suspension, etc.
The Ascent HK system is better than decent. I have it in my Ascent and I've also installed many high-end aftermarket systems, some which cost me thousands. The Ascent's HK system has excellent speakers everywhere (14 total), a very good DSP amp, and a decent subwoofer. It comes close to excellent except for two flaws, it lacks an equalizer (has only bass-mid-treble tone controls) and the subwoofer is not powerful enough.

However, if you spend enough time adjusting it, the sound approaches the quality of many excellent aftermarket systems. With an equalizer, I know I could get it to sound superb.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top