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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
anyone know if there is a filter in the cvt tranny? it has a pan, and has to have a pump; so it seems there should be a filter. i never change fluid without changing the filter. bad policy. new fluids can loosen up old crud and run it around through the system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
good stuff. thanks for the info. will begin looking to see if filters are available yet for 2019 ascents. sometimes it can take a while for new parts to arrive on scene.
 

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Yes, it's inside the TR690, and not a filter you want to try swapping at home.
 

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@0:47, the technician said it's a filter that can be access like typical filter you'd see from Toyota trannies. IRRC, there's a second filter, looks like a typical filter cartridge, that's deep inside the CVT.
 

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You really shouldn't be messing with the CVT at home. I just shared this in another thread about the CVT...
 

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You really shouldn't be messing with the CVT at home. I just shared this in another thread about the CVT...
Be careful of your determinations. Just because a person looks knowledgeable, doesn't mean their words have substance (or coherent logics). e.g. he noted the CVT fluid, for a particular subaru model, to be "lifetime" (@1:46) and the user should change the fluid at ~28K mile "for severe conditions" (@2:00); in practice, what should we do? He doesn't make any recommendation on what he regurgitated, simply because he doesnt know. He should've asked the Subaru representative to define "lifetime"; is it ~28K miles, 100K miles, or 1M miles? To me, "lifetime" is 5yrs or 100K miles, which is consistent with auto part stores' warranty (based on statistic that people keep their car for about 5yrs).

Again, the things he said are relevant, but they're not being substantiated. It would be good if that video, a youtuber, is coupled with a Subaru technician (e.g. the aussie guy in video I posted) to help substantiate his claims. In fact, somewhere in the video, he even alluded to not having any substantial technical experience on Subaru CVT.

In order to determine if the Ascent's CVT can be serviced at home, these questions have to be answered:
1. Can we access to drain and fill?
2. Can we adequately quantify the drain and fill amounts w/o having to use STIS?
 

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Subaru should allow owner's to change out the oil. I'll just have to pray that the CVT last.The manual does not list the oil type but points you to your dealer. In MA we have the right to repair or to service our own cars law.
 

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Subaru should allow owner's to change out the oil. I'll just have to pray that the CVT last.The manual does not list the oil type but points you to your dealer. In MA we have the right to repair or to service our own cars law.
I've posted the oil type and part number above.

Subaru does not prevent anyone from servicing their CVT. The problem is that 8t requires special tools to properly service it, such as an SSM4.
 

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I've posted the oil type and part number above.

Subaru does not prevent anyone from servicing their CVT. The problem is that 8t requires special tools to properly service it, such as an SSM4.
I haven't really looked at my CVT to see if there's a drain/fill hole or to drain I need to crack the case open. I did see your other post with the oil part number. It comes in a 5 gallon container.
 

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I haven't really looked at my CVT to see if there's a drain/fill hole or to drain I need to crack the case open. I did see your other post with the oil part number. It comes in a 5 gallon container.
Yes, only a 5 gallon pail, but some dealerships will fill smaller containers.

You can't miss the drain plug. It's on the massive pan that many people mistake for the oil pan. Fill holes are also accessible.

The problem is that it requires a very specific full routine that's temperature dependant, which requires the SSMv4 to read internal data.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks for all of the input from everyone. my first project will be to investigate the accuracy of the statement in the posted video about cvt self-service voiding the warranty. i don't remember reading that anywhere, but will check again. i will also have my friend, who is a lemon-law attorney, review it as well.
i do see the internal filter in the exploded view; but if there is a primary filter in the pan, then it would collect debris before the internal one, unless it is just a screen. i have worked on cars for 40+ years, and many trannies in that time. i am not completely in agreement with the statement about only clutch pack material causing wear in passages. metallic particles are more of a problem; and this arises from lack of lubricity due to tired, worn out fluid and lack of filter service. the fluid is not just there to make pressure. in links from here, and some found on my own; cvt trannies also have clutch packs which can just as easily cause the fluid breakdown and wear problems.
the biggest culprit in the cvt transmission is the variable clutches and chain assembly. in looking at posted videos of cvt teardowns (many brands), they have shown the biggest failure cause is from that area. these pieces are direct metal-to-metal contact components where fluid lubricity is critical to prevent galling between the contact/friction surfaces. this will definitely cause metal debris and extreme heat at these points. the comments made by the technicians in those videos consistently are recommending adequate fluid/filter service intervals to prevent loss of lubricity and component failure, which they are shown repairing.
even if using the factory subaru cvt fluid, which i will not (i use amsoil in my vehicles, far better stuff), my research so far has shown me that it is worth pursuing this subject. i do not want a reman trans in my new car, when it could have been prevented with simple servicing.
 

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even if using the factory subaru cvt fluid, which i will not (i use amsoil in my vehicles, far better stuff), my research so far has shown me that it is worth pursuing this subject. i do not want a reman trans in my new car, when it could have been prevented with simple servicing.
That will cause claims denials. You will also probably destroy your CVT. I already had to help a service center figure out why they toasted three in the same car.

Our TR690 has a much higher clamping pressure, and different valve body programming and different internal pressure and is under much higher load.

Unless it has happened in the last few weeks, Amsoil does NOT have a compatible fluid. Only JX Nippon does, the last time I checked, and they exclusively sell it to Subaru.

Previous TR690 CVT fluids do not work in our TR690 CVT.

In the few day interim, I got the correct part numbers and explained what was happening to them, and they double checked everything and confirmed.

The fluid used was supposedly TR690 compatible. It isn't for our TR690. It will sheer, burn, fall apart and come out through the vents in vaporized burnt form. Friction will increase tremendously under the higher clamping pressure and the CVT will screech and stink.

1215


1214
 

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I wouldn't have a problem using OEM CVT oil at all but i don't like the fact you have to use a Subaru diag tool for the service.
I think there's a way around that, like ActiveODB and a dongle. There are also likely a few aftermarket solutions hitting the market soon though, if there aren't already.

At some point, I am sure that the COBB AccessPort will be helpful for such things as well, but currently, they advise me that they cannot guarantee the accuracy of the data the non-Ascent versions display.

I for one, would love one. Whether my own SSMv4 or an aftermarket solution.
 

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I think there's a way around that, like ActiveODB and a dongle. There are also likely a few aftermarket solutions hitting the market soon though, if there aren't already.

At some point, I am sure that the COBB AccessPort will be helpful for such things as well, but currently, they advise me that they cannot guarantee the accuracy of the data the non-Ascent versions display.

I for one, would love one. Whether my own SSMv4 or an aftermarket solution.
I actually have a AP form a WRX that I could trade in and get some money on this with Cobb. It would be awesome if they released it. Either way I would have the dealer change out the CVT oil at 25k, if I can't figure a way to do it correctly. I don't believe in any lifetime fluid crap Subaru's selling.
 

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thanks for all of the input from everyone. my first project will be to investigate the accuracy of the statement in the posted video about cvt self-service voiding the warranty. i don't remember reading that anywhere, but will check again. i will also have my friend, who is a lemon-law attorney, review it as well.
i do see the internal filter in the exploded view; but if there is a primary filter in the pan, then it would collect debris before the internal one, unless it is just a screen. i have worked on cars for 40+ years, and many trannies in that time. i am not completely in agreement with the statement about only clutch pack material causing wear in passages. metallic particles are more of a problem; and this arises from lack of lubricity due to tired, worn out fluid and lack of filter service. the fluid is not just there to make pressure. in links from here, and some found on my own; cvt trannies also have clutch packs which can just as easily cause the fluid breakdown and wear problems.
the biggest culprit in the cvt transmission is the variable clutches and chain assembly. in looking at posted videos of cvt teardowns (many brands), they have shown the biggest failure cause is from that area. these pieces are direct metal-to-metal contact components where fluid lubricity is critical to prevent galling between the contact/friction surfaces. this will definitely cause metal debris and extreme heat at these points. the comments made by the technicians in those videos consistently are recommending adequate fluid/filter service intervals to prevent loss of lubricity and component failure, which they are shown repairing.
even if using the factory subaru cvt fluid, which i will not (i use amsoil in my vehicles, far better stuff), my research so far has shown me that it is worth pursuing this subject. i do not want a reman trans in my new car, when it could have been prevented with simple servicing.
Looks like you have it all figured out then. Best of luck to you. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That will cause claims denials. You will also probably destroy your CVT. I already had to help a service center figure out why they toasted three in the same car.

Our TR690 has a much higher clamping pressure, and different valve body programming and different internal pressure and is under much higher load.

Unless it has happened in the last few weeks, Amsoil does NOT have a compatible fluid. Only JX Nippon does, the last time I checked, and they exclusively sell it to Subaru.

Previous TR690 CVT fluids do not work in our TR690 CVT.

In the few day interim, I got the correct part numbers and explained what was happening to them, and they double checked everything and confirmed.

The fluid used was supposedly TR690 compatible. It isn't for our TR690. It will sheer, burn, fall apart and come out through the vents in vaporized burnt form. Friction will increase tremendously under the higher clamping pressure and the CVT will screech and stink.

View attachment 1215
That will cause claims denials. You will also probably destroy your CVT. I already had to help a service center figure out why they toasted three in the same car.

Our TR690 has a much higher clamping pressure, and different valve body programming and different internal pressure and is under much higher load.

Unless it has happened in the last few weeks, Amsoil does NOT have a compatible fluid. Only JX Nippon does, the last time I checked, and they exclusively sell it to Subaru.

Previous TR690 CVT fluids do not work in our TR690 CVT.

In the few day interim, I got the correct part numbers and explained what was happening to them, and they double checked everything and confirmed.

The fluid used was supposedly TR690 compatible. It isn't for our TR690. It will sheer, burn, fall apart and come out through the vents in vaporized burnt form. Friction will increase tremendously under the higher clamping pressure and the CVT will screech and stink.
That will cause claims denials. You will also probably destroy your CVT. I already had to help a service center figure out why they toasted three in the same car.

Our TR690 has a much higher clamping pressure, and different valve body programming and different internal pressure and is under much higher load.

Unless it has happened in the last few weeks, Amsoil does NOT have a compatible fluid. Only JX Nippon does, the last time I checked, and they exclusively sell it to Subaru.

Previous TR690 CVT fluids do not work in our TR690 CVT.

In the few day interim, I got the correct part numbers and explained what was happening to them, and they double checked everything and confirmed.

The fluid used was supposedly TR690 compatible. It isn't for our TR690. It will sheer, burn, fall apart and come out through the vents in vaporized burnt form. Friction will increase tremendously under the higher clamping pressure and the CVT will screech and stink.

View attachment 1215

View attachment 1214
What fluid was used in your contact you posted? You did not say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Just a follow up about cvt fluids so there is no misinformation being disseminated. in speaking with the technical support dept at amsoil just moments ago, i was told that their cvt fluid meets and exceeds the requirements for all subaru cvt transmissions, and those of other car makers which i already knew. of course no one would want to place regular atf in cvt type transmissions. if there is definitive literature that shows definitive info about what you previously stated, please include it, with the source, so i may forward it to amsoil for their review. i have attached amsoil's product info for review. they also guarantee that your vehicle warranty is in full force if you use their product(s) in accordance with their recommended applications. if it won't work, they won't recommend it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Recommended Products 2019 SUBARU ASCENT 2.4L 4-cyl Engine Code [A] FA24 Turbo








LUBRICANTS & FLUIDS:

Engine Oil
Grade 1......SN[1]
Maximum Performance Signature Series 0W-20 Synthetic Motor Oil (ASMQT)
Drain Interval Information
Performance Plus XL 0W-20 Synthetic Motor Oil (XLZQT)
Drain Interval Information
Performance OE 0W-20 Synthetic Motor Oil (OEZQT)
Drain Interval Information
All TEMPS......0W-20
Automatic Transmission,TR690......VTF22
Synthetic CVT Fluid (CVTQT)
Differential, Rear......GLSB4 [2]
All TEMPS......
No AMSOIL Product Recommendation
Differential, Front......GLSB4 [2]
All TEMPS......
No AMSOIL Product Recommendation

[1] Synthetic oil is required.
[2] Subaru recommends the use of Subaru Extra MT. As alternative
GL-5 SAE 75W-90 may be used, however using this type of oil
will detract from driveability and fuel efficiency.
 
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