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Just got a new Ascent and a new Forester over the past few weeks. I put studded Nokian Hakka 9's on both. Super impressed with both compared to the luxury SUV's I've driven for years. A totally different driving experience with the symmetrical AWD, very impressive, by far the best AWD on the market today. I do slightly favor the Ascent because of it's size & towing capacity. I do wish the Ascent offered the same StarLink features and more choice for the Premier model color & interior.
 

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I agree, the Ascent tops the list! As the article mentions though, all these vehicles were equipped with OEM tires. The sportier SUV's had less aggressive tires, which might explain some of the Subaru advantage. No Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Nissan, Toyota, etc.
 

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I have the 2020 Ascent Limited and am very impressed with my winter driving here in Wisconsin. Simply amazing how well it handles and plows thru the snow. I do have a few questions....

1. Does anyone know what percentage of power is going to the front vs the rear wheels when no slippage is being detected?

2. When slippage is detected, up to how much percentage can be redirected?

Thanks much!
 

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1. 60/40
2. this might tell you
Thank you so much for the link to the video! This was very helpful. When I had asked my salesman, he thought the Ascent was 80/20% front to rear. But in the recent snow storms we've experienced it definitely seemed much equally distributed as it was extremely surefooted. I am just so impressed with this system :)

Thanks for helping me understand how it works!
 

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Correct on the first part, but torque can only be sent to the rear, to up to a 50:50 ratio.
Which makes me baffled since beside the most recent 2017 simulation vid which shows single wheel slip, Subaru repeatedly showed ATS systems sending power front or rear in videos and simulations. Ever since the 60/40 split went into effect across the lines in 2009 and 2010, they've been using the same marketing vids and images showing full power shift to rear as necessary. It's unlikely the videos were talking about the viscous systems in the non-sports-car manuals, especially since those can't manage much more than 80% in either direction.

In this video, they show torque being redirected in every direction, including instances of most of the torque being directed to the front wheels or to the rear wheels.

3045
 

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The four current Subaru systems:
  1. Available on the manual transmission Crosstrek, Forester and more, is the Viscous Center Differential (VCD). This option splits torque 50/50 between the front and rear wheels. The viscous coupling will automatically send power to each wheel with more traction, letting you tackle icy or wet road conditions easier.

  2. The Active Torque Split (ATS) system included on all continuously variable transmission (CVT) models except the WRX, is your next most common system. Slightly different from the VCD, the ATS splits power 60/40 between the front and rear. This slight front bias offers better fuel economy, while still delivering power to the rear. This one doesn't have a center differential, but a multi-plate clutch that is in a viscous fluid to allow slip, while still being partially engaged continually.
    ???
    THIS IS THE SYSTEM USED IN THE ASCENT


  3. Available only on the CVT WRX models is the Variable Torque Distribution (VTD) system. With a more rear biased standard configuration, the split is 45/55 on the WRX. Sport-like driving requires more power in the rear, and the VTD delivers. The planetary center differential and electronic hydraulic transfer clutch are smooth and agile when you need more power to different wheels.

  4. The unique STI drivetrain is highly sophisticated and tuned to create a driving experience like no other. A Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD) combines a mechanical and electronic limited slip differential allowing the computer to decide where power is needed, or if so desired, the driver can lock the differential in their preferred configuration. The front axle offers a Helical limited slip differential while the rear holds a Torsen limited slip differential.

90/10 was retired ages ago, and 80/20 was retired over a decade ago.
 
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