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We looked at the GeoPro 19QB & 19BH (lacking build quality but great layout) and the Lance 1685. We know the 1575 can be towed behind our 2019 Ascent Touring but the layout is lacking for us. Quality excellent but no sink in, or easy access to, bathroom??? We really like the Lance 1685. Do we really need to forgo using the Ascent and just buy a truck for a larger trailer??!! Has anyone here used their Ascent with a Lance 1685 successfully? Am I just hastening the life of my SUV doing this? We're in No. California and don't plan on winter travel. But the quality & functionality in a trailer is very important. We also want to buy locally so we have a reputable source for repairs.
Thoughts?
Thanks
 

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I've been looking at the Lance 1685 for many months now. It's at the very top of my list of Travel Trailers to buy because I love the layout and the build quality is so much better than most other trailers which seem shabby in comparison. And it's a dual axle trailer which is more stable and safer to tow than a single. Yet compared to other premium RVs such as the Airstream, the price is reasonable.

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The only issue is the weight with the Ascent as a tow vehicle. The 1685 weighs 3980 lbs dry with a hitch weight of 425 lbs. This is within the Ascent's towing capabilities. However, once you start loading the 1685 with all the available options, the weight goes up to 4500 lbs. This leaves only 500 lbs for cargo. So, as long as you don't exceed 500 lbs of cargo and watch the weight distribution so that the hitch weight never exceeds 500 lbs, you're technically good to go.

However, if you listen to many other people, they'll tell you never to approach a tow vehicle's upper limits. This is probably good advice, it's wise not to approach the limits of anything. That said, it's my belief that it would tow fine with the Ascent as long as you drove it conservatively and didn't push it by trying to go too fast or over long mountainous climbs. People in this forum have reported no issues when towing loads very close to the Ascent's limits. Yet many may still disagree. No one will know for sure until someone actually tries it and reports back.

I'm still thinking of getting a 1685 because I have not yet found anything better. If, by this fall when I plan to buy, I still haven't found anything I like better, I most likely will get one. I will carefully consider and monitor the cargo weight and hitch weight, but I'm guessing I'll have no major problems. However, I can't yet recommend a 1685 to anyone else until I have the opportunity to test it with the Ascent myself.
 

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I tow a fully loaded trailer at around 3250 lbs loaded (and weighed) with a tongue weight of 375 lbs. After putting just a little over 5000 miles last year in the west over the Cascades and Rockies, sometimes in fairly warm weather (90 degrees plus), I concluded that I, and this is just me, wouldn't want to tow any trailer much bigger than the one I have, over mountain passes, for any extended amount of time or distance. My trailer is a basic trailer, and fancy is certainly not a word I'd use to describe it, but it gets the job done. However, after those 5000 miles I decided that if I wanted to pull a larger trailer for a similar number of miles over the same terrain, I'd get a more capable tow vehicle, probably a full-size pickup.
 

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I tow a fully loaded trailer at around 3250 lbs loaded (and weighed) with a tongue weight of 375 lbs. After putting just a little over 5000 miles last year in the west over the Cascades and Rockies, sometimes in fairly warm weather (90 degrees plus), I concluded that I, and this is just me, wouldn't want to tow any trailer much bigger than the one I have, over mountain passes, for any extended amount of time or distance. My trailer is a basic trailer, and fancy is certainly not a word I'd use to describe it, but it gets the job done. However, after those 5000 miles I decided that if I wanted to pull a larger trailer for a similar number of miles over the same terrain, I'd get a more capable tow vehicle, probably a full-size pickup.
Could you please go into more detail? In which way did you feel the Ascent was deficient - power, braking, sway, overheating?

I'm surprised at this, I thought the Ascent was a capable tow vehicle up to 5,000 lbs as advertised but you're implying that there were issues even at only 3250 lbs. That's concerning to me. Please elaborate.
 

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Could you please go into more detail? In which way did you feel the Ascent was deficient - power, braking, sway, overheating?

I'm surprised at this, I thought the Ascent was a capable tow vehicle up to 5,000 lbs as advertised but you're implying that there were issues even at only 3250 lbs. That's concerning to me. Please elaborate.
I'm comfortable towing 3250 lbs, but even when following Subaru's guidance to not exceed 45 mph when going up a grade there were times in warm weather the AC would automatically turn off, as it's designed to do, to prevent overheating. If it's a long grade things get mighty warm by the time I reach the summit. Given the terrain I must navigate here in the Pacific Northwest, the distances I travel to go fly fishing, which is what I bought my trailer for, and the frequency I take it out, I just feel a much larger trailer would put a strain on my Ascent that is unacceptable to me. I also travel alone, and travel fairly light, and come nowhere close to the vehicle's GVWR. When going up some of the grades I routinely travel here in the PNW, the Ascent feels as though it's straining. I admit to routinely erring on the side of caution, maybe to a fault, but it feels to me that my Ascent is working hard when it's going up these mountain passes. Since I generally keep my cars for at least ten years, if I were to go with a bigger trailer and use it how, when and where I do, I would get a more capable tow vehicle.
 

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@pro10is , I'm thinking that the capacities and intended travel use have to be carefully balanced....and that's not just relative to the Ascent world. Folks who are primarily towing in "milder terrain" or in the flatlands are going to have a joyful time nudging the capacity limits while still enjoying decent performance. Folks who commonly tow in more difficult situations are going to have to either opt for a more modest load or be willing to accept that performance isn't going to be great "up in them thar mountains" when the going gets rough. While I don't do the camping thing, I personally subscribe to the "don't push the limits of capacity" relative to towing across the board. I like having some margin there for extra piece of mind. Given that, even if I were going to confine travel to "the flatlands", I'd probably not opt for this very nice camper with the Ascent simply because it cuts things too close for my personal feeling of comfort.
 

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I'm not sure there is anything to worry over. All engineering perspectives take this into consideration. When this vehicle was rated to tow 5000 Lbs with 500Lbs tongue weight it means that it was tested and engineered to handle 30 percent greater. This is a common safety factor that virtually all engineering takes into consideration. They know someone will tow more than 5000 Lbs because it will happen and everyone knows it. I don't doubt that towing with 5000 Lbs will reduce power, speed and performance on hilly terrain. But I'm certain Subaru engineers will say the Ascent can safely tow 5000 Lbs without failure. In this sense I don't believe it's a concern. However as suggested if you were to tow all over north america with 5000 Lbs constantly it wouldn't make a lot of sense using an Ascent since the primary application is towing only.
 

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Personally, I would NOT get the NEW Lance 1,685. It's heavier than the outgoing version and is too heavy for the Ascent - not to mention that if you get into an accident, your insurance WILL fight you over paying any claims because its GVWR clearly exceeds the Ascent's rating.

If you have it ENTIRELY empty with NO added accessories, NO supplies, NO pillows and blankets, NO gear, it starts at 3,980 pounds. If you forget to empty ALL dirty tanks (lets say when traveling from place to place, and you just keep refilling the potable tank until you get to a dump station), then that's as much as 1,126 pounds in the water tanks. That puts you at 5,106 pounds, which is already over the Ascent's max towing spec.

Then, let's add a couple propane tanks and subtract an entire water tank by being diligent about emptying your tanks. That's 899 pounds plus empty weight, meaning 4,879 pounds. No gear, no blankets, no towels, no soap, no dishes, no food, no drinks, no clothing, no accessories.

Even using the 9-11% tongue weight recommendation in the Ascent manual, at 10%, that means an empty trailer (just 2 water tanks and propane for food you couldn't bring), that's 488 pound tongue weight. That drops your inside car cargo weight by that 488 pounds. On a Touring with 1,132 pound cargo weight, that means you have 644 pounds left for people and gear in the Ascent.


  • Gross Dry Weight 3980 Lbs.
  • Hitch Dry Weight 425 Lbs.
  • Axle Weight 3555 Lbs.
  • Cargo Carrying Capacity 1520 Lbs.
  • GVWR 5500 Lbs.
 

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I'm not sure there is anything to worry over. All engineering perspectives take this into consideration. When this vehicle was rated to tow 5000 Lbs with 500Lbs tongue weight it means that it was tested and engineered to handle 30 percent greater. This is a common safety factor that virtually all engineering takes into consideration. They know someone will tow more than 5000 Lbs because it will happen and everyone knows it. I don't doubt that towing with 5000 Lbs will reduce power, speed and performance on hilly terrain. But I'm certain Subaru engineers will say the Ascent can safely tow 5000 Lbs without failure. In this sense I don't believe it's a concern. However as suggested if you were to tow all over north america with 5000 Lbs constantly it wouldn't make a lot of sense using an Ascent since the primary application is towing only.
I believe this assessment to be correct and the most relevant to this specific discussion. Subaru, who tends to be careful and conservative in their designs and ratings, is not going to carelessly spec the towing capabilities right up against the failure point, especially since they use CVTs which they're trying hard to prove are as reliable as conventional transmissions. This would cost them dearly in warranty repairs and terrible publicity. Far better to spec the towing capabilities at around 75-80% of the actual max load, thereby building in the safety margin rather than letting their customers push it to the breaking point and end up with thousands of Ascents in dealer bays getting repaired at Subarus' expense under warranty or be liable for accidents. When they say the Ascent can pull 5000 lbs, I believe they're saying it with a good deal of confidence knowing an adequate margin of safety exists.

I feel that the reason to choose a significantly lighter trailer is more about driving comfort and convenience. Obviously, it's going to be more difficult to pull a heavy trailer than a lighter one. This will reduce gas mileage, make it harder to accelerate, harder to maneuver quickly, harder and less comfortable to climb hills, and take longer to stop. These are all very good reasons to select a lighter trailer if drivability is your primary concern.

However, choosing a trailer close to the Accent's towing capabilities is not a show stopper as some may feel, rather it's a trade-off. You're sacrificing some driving comfort for trailer comfort and capabilities. This might work for a lot of people. For example, my plan is to tow my trailer somewhere where I want to vacation, and then stay there for the winter months. The drive to my destination with a heavier trailer rather than a lighter trailer might not be as pleasant, but once I arrive I'll enjoy considerably more comfort living day to day in a more capable trailer for several months. That's a good trade-off. Towing anything significant, whether it weighs 3500 lbs or 4800 lbs was not going to be much fun anyway. It's not like I'd be zipping along having a blast towing a 3500 lb trailer. I plan to take my time getting there, going slowly, steadily, and safely. As a bonus, the Lance 1685 has a double axle that provides better stability, drivability, and safety over a lighter trailer's single axle and is far better built than most lightweight trailers for a better overall experience.

If, however, my plans were to be on the road as much as living in the trailer, I would probably choose a setup with maximum drivability. This would mean an Ascent with a very lightweight, less comfortable/capable trailer or selecting a less comfortable truck as a tow vehicle. The tradeoffs are always there no matter what you do. You just have to pick the tradeoffs that work best for you.

So a lot of this is up to each individual's intentions. I've observed that a lot of people don't stick with the first trailer or even the tow vehicle they selected. They often fine-tune their towing rigs to what they ended up deciding after gaining more experience as to what's best for them individually for their specific purposes. There's no one size fits all here.

Keep in mind that there are all kinds of such trade-offs when choosing a tow vehicle and trailer. I've own pickups for over 20 years. While they are indeed the most capable tow vehicles, they're also one of the worst vehicles for driving comfort, especially for long distances. The same is true for trailers, the biggest and most comfortable ones are going to be the worst for towing. It's all about finding a comfort vs tradeoff level that works for you.

As I said earlier, I still plan on buying the Lance 1685 in the fall unless I find something better. I feel that while it's at the upper end of the limits, it's still safely within the Ascent's towing capabilities and the overall advantages outweigh the disadvantages, at least in my case. After much research for over a year now, for my intended purpose, I feel any reasonable impact on drivability over a lighter, less capable, less well-built trailer is justified.

I do greatly appreciate everyone's opinions, but nothing I've seen or read here or elsewhere has yet to change my mind. This decision is mine alone, I won't recommend it to anyone else until after I have experience towing the 1685. At that stage, I'll post a full report here.

To the OP, I wish I could help you out more right now, but we need more feedback from actual usage rather than just speculation and opinion before anyone can factually state that this and other trailers like it will/will not work well the Ascent.
 

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Robert brings up a really important trade-off refreshing the fact that tongue weight comes off vehicle cargo weight. In his example, myself, my spouse and our older daughter would collectively nearly exceed the available cargo capacity if we were towing something with a near-500 lb tongue weight. That's without any luggage. It would be doable with two people, but not all three of us. And yea..."can physically do" doesn't count with insurance if something goes awry. So again, I'm all for the more conservative, "don't get close to the specification limit" approach relative to towing.
 
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Personally, I would NOT get the NEW Lance 1,685. It's heavier than the outgoing version and is too heavy for the Ascent - not to mention that if you get into an accident, your insurance WILL fight you over paying any claims because its GVWR clearly exceeds the Ascent's rating.

If you have it ENTIRELY empty with NO added accessories, NO supplies, NO pillows and blankets, NO gear, it starts at 3,980 pounds. If you forget to empty ALL dirty tanks (lets say when traveling from place to place, and you just keep refilling the potable tank until you get to a dump station), then that's as much as 1,126 pounds in the water tanks. That puts you at 5,106 pounds, which is already over the Ascent's max towing spec.

Then, let's add a couple propane tanks and subtract an entire water tank by being diligent about emptying your tanks. That's 899 pounds plus empty weight, meaning 4,879 pounds. No gear, no blankets, no towels, no soap, no dishes, no food, no drinks, no clothing, no accessories.

Even using the 9-11% tongue weight recommendation in the Ascent manual, at 10%, that means an empty trailer (just 2 water tanks and propane for food you couldn't bring), that's 488 pound tongue weight. That drops your inside car cargo weight by that 488 pounds. On a Touring with 1,132 pound cargo weight, that means you have 644 pounds left for people and gear in the Ascent.


  • Gross Dry Weight 3980 Lbs.
  • Hitch Dry Weight 425 Lbs.
  • Axle Weight 3555 Lbs.
  • Cargo Carrying Capacity 1520 Lbs.
  • GVWR 5500 Lbs.
The specs for the 2020 Lance 1685 remain the same as last years and 2018's. This is directly from Lance's website today:

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I've been researching this trailer for over a year, it is not too heavy for the Ascent as long as you diligently manage the available options and the total cargo weight. This is something that should be done with any trailer btw.

As far as GVWR, we've talked at length about this before. A better GVWR means a trailer is safer than one with an inferior GVWR. I've heard of trailers like the typically chosen Apex Nano 187RB with a GVWR of only 3800 lb, a Gross Axle Weight Rating of 3500 lb (!!), and a Gross Dry Weight of 3054 lbs, and typically loaded to a Gross Trailer Weight of around 3700 lbs! Now that's something an insurance company should take note of because the trailer may fail catastrophically with only a cargo load of a few extra hundred pounds. Yet this is a trailer one might easily consider more suitable to the Ascent than the 1685!

On the Apex Nano 187RB, with a GVWR of only 3800 lb and a Gross Dry Weight of 3054 lbs, that leaves only 746 lbs left for all cargo, including any added options. The 1685 has a GVWR of 5500 lbs and Gross Dry Weight of 3980 lbs leaving a cargo weight of 1520 lbs, including added options. Staying within the Ascent's towing limits, you can use up to 1,020 lbs of that for all cargo weight combined, including all options and all added cargo. Compare that to the Apex Nano's miserly 746 lb maximum for options and cargo. So please don't state that the 1685 is cargo limited over other trailers. And I'll take the 1685's far superior and safer ratings over the seemingly more suitable Apex Nano any day and challenge anyone, including insurance companies, as to which trailer is safer and less likely to result in an accident or failure. The worst you're likely to do with a foolishly overloaded but well built 1685 is to damage your transmission, with a foolishly overloaded and less well built Apex Nano, the axle can fail and cause a major accident involving other vehicles. If you were an insurance company, which would you be more concerned about? The Lance 1685 has an incredible GVWR because it has two axles, not one, meaning that it's much better built than most other trailers of its size and much less likely of a catastrophic failure due to overloading.

I've discussed this at length in an earlier post here and I thought we were now beyond this kind of thinking, but now it looks like I'll need to repeat some of it again here.

Technically, the greater the trailer's GVWR the better (up to practical physical limits), as long as you never exceed the maximum gross trailer weight allowed by the tow vehicle and the Gross Dry Weight is acceptable. We all should know that it is the lesser of the towing spec of either the trailer or the tow vehicle which applies. That's trailer towing 101.

It's completely up to the owner to properly stay within the limits of either the tow vehicle or the trailer whichever is the lesser. You could select a trailer with a GVWR well above 5000 Lbs for the Ascent just as long as you fully understand that the maximum you could ever load it must stay below 5000 lbs total gross weight.

So this is why I disagree with any advice that states not to purchase a trailer with a GVWR of more than the tow vehicle's maximum towing capacity. It simply does not make sense as long as the owner is smart enough to know the limits of the tow vehicle. It's merely dumbing down type advice that should be given only to people who are incapable of understanding what all the numbers involved mean. It may (or may not) help keep unknowledgeable people safer, but it may also likely put them into an inferior, less safe trailer. It's much better to go a few steps more and try to teach what the numbers actually mean so buyers can select the best and safest trailer available within their needs and budget. Why rule out a better-made, safer trailer on a misleading premise?

Using the Lance 1685 with an Ascent allows up to around 500-1020 lbs of cargo depending upon which options you choose. That's enough for most people and very similar to many lighter weight trailers which are instead limited by a single axle rather than the max tow rating. Yes, a superior GVWR of 5500 lbs could conceivably encourage someone foolish to grossly overload it for a specific tow vehicle, but again someone foolish may just as likely overload any trailer. I assume we're not talking to anyone so foolish here and that anyone buying any trailer would have done enough homework to understand that the lesser loading specs of either the tow vehicle or the trailer is the overruling factor.

As far as tongue weight, the 1685 is no different than any other trailer, it's much more about the final weight distribution than the trailer/cargo total weight. I've seen ultralightweight trailers weighing much less than the 1685 with a much higher dry tongue weight. This is something every trailer owner must manage via diligent weight distribution. No one knows for certain what the final tongue weight of their trailer will be until they load it. This applies to any trailer, light or heavy. It can be greater or lesser than the rated dry tongue weight.

I've stated every time we discuss the 1685 that the owner needs to be diligent about cargo weight and not be so careless as to drive around with the tanks full or other such overloaded cargo, but this is true for all trailers, often for different reasons. To properly load any trailer, you have to factor in everything. There may be a bit less room for error towing the 1685 or other trailers in its weight class, but it can be safely done within the limits of the Ascent's capabilities with careful diligence. If this is not for you, then find something lighter, but do not rule out anything until you carefully work out all the numbers.
 

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Rob,
The specs for the 2020 Lance 1685 remain the same as last year's. This is directly from Lance's website today:
I could have been more clear. Previous model year 1685s were lighter. The recent years (plural). Neither the previous years nor current years are within the range Subaru indicates that the Ascent should tow.

For example, a 2015:
(lighter but not light enough)
Weight. 3,405 lbs.
Cargo: 1,995 lbs.
GVWR: 5,400 lbs.
 

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I could have been more clear. Previous model year 1685s were lighter. The recent years (plural). Neither the previous years nor current years are within the range Subaru indicates that the Ascent should tow.

For example, a 2015:
(lighter but not light enough)
Weight. 3,405 lbs.
Cargo: 1,995 lbs.
GVWR: 5,400 lbs.
Subaru specifies to the world that the Ascent can tow a trailer weighing 5000 lbs and with a tongue weight of 500 lbs. This is as clear and as official as they get.

The 2020 Lance 1685 has a Gross Dry weight of 3980 lbs and a Hitch Dry Weight 425 lbs. That is technically well within Subaru's towing specifications. The GVWR has nothing to do with this, it merely states the maximum weight the trailer can bear, nothing more.

As long as the final trailering weight of the Lance 1685 is well managed, it can remain within Subaru's specified towing limits for the Ascent, albeit at the upper limit.

Those are the facts, everything else is opinion. We can discuss forever if the 1685 is a viable choice. We won't know until someone actually tries it.
 

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Subaru specifies to the world that the Ascent can tow a trailer weighing 5000 lbs and with a tongue weight of 500 lbs. This is as clear and as official as they get.

The 2020 Lance 1685 has a Gross Dry weight of 3980 lbs and a Hitch Dry Weight 425 lbs. That is technically well within Subaru's towing specifications. The GVWR has nothing to do with this, it merely states the maximum weight the trailer can bear, nothing more.

As long as the final trailering weight of the Lance 1685 is well managed, it can remain within Subaru's specified towing limits for the Ascent, albeit at the upper limit.

Those are the facts, everything else is opinion. We can discuss forever if the 1685 is a viable choice. We won't know until someone actually tries it.
Absolutely nothing I said was opinion.
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Absolutely nothing I said was opinion.
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The Lance 1685 does not violate anything stated here. This is nothing but vague and obvious statements with no meaningful specifications given. Nowhere does it state that the GVRW (GVW) cannot exceed 5000 lbs. Subaru specifically specifies only that the Gross Trailer Weight (GTW) cannot exceed 5000 lbs. This is the actual weight of the trailer and all cargo, not the maximum rated weight (GVRW/GVW) the trailer can bear. There is a huge difference there. This statement is merely warning you not to exceed the maximum load ratings of a trailer, not to under-exceed them. Isn't that obvious?

Just because a trailer is simply made stronger than the maximum tow rating of a specific vehicle cannot disqualify it. That's like a manufacturer or insurance company saying you own a house manufactured to withstand hurricane forces but we cannot endorse it because you won't be using it in such weather. That makes absolutely no sense. Stronger is better and safer, not the opposite. What do you think Subaru is saying, that you can only purchase less well-made trailers?

You can take a tiny, super ultra-lightweight trailer, put a couple of military-grade titanium axles on it and give it a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating of 10,000 lbs. How could that possibly disqualify it for use in towing only 5000 lbs? It wouldn't, otherwise manufacturers would not be allowed to make any trailer better than what it's allowed to carry by a vehicle's tow ratings. That would mean, for example, you couldn't use a utility trailer rated to handle 3 tons with a car rated to tow 2. We all know that's nonsense. It's obviously up to the end-user not to exceed the lesser of the tow ratings.
 

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And yet, it's those figures insurance companies and investigators will start with in the event of an accident, as well as any car company would in the event of a warranty claim. Those also aren't opinions.

Rationalizing away what's on paper doesn't work. You should not suggest to others that it is.

Enjoy your trailer. It's not a great choice for the Ascent. Doesn't mean you can't do what you want.
 

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And yet, it's those figures insurance companies and investigators will start with in the event of an accident, as well as any car company would in the event of a warranty claim. Those also aren't opinions.

Rationalizing away what's on paper doesn't work. You should not suggest to others that it is.

Enjoy your trailer. It's not a great choice for the Ascent. Doesn't mean you can't do what you want.
An insurance company can investigate whatever they want and often do. But if a denial makes no sense technically, they won't have a leg to stand on in court, that's why there are federal and state insurance laws to protect consumers from frivolous reasons insurance companies may try to use to deny claims. Unless someone clearly overloaded a trailer, in which case they deserved to be denied, a high GVRW holds no importance other than to prove that the trailer was well made. Again, someone is far more likely to overload a trailer with a poor GVRW and be denied a claim for that, and a trailer with a superior build is far less likely to fail resulting in an accident, yet you don't seem to bring up those points.

I try very hard not to rationalize anything, I go way out of my way looking for facts. If you think that I've stated any sort of a rationalization, then let's debate it.

Neither you nor I nor anyone else knows for a fact yet if the 1685 is or is not a great choice for the Ascent. I've stated that clearly several times in this thread alone, as well as others. It remains to be seen. I sincerely hope I'm one of the first to find out. But one thing's for sure, its GVRW certainly does not rule it out nor do any other of its specs which all fall within the Ascent's tow ratings with proper weight management.
 

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I'm not debating it, and, btw, I work in insurance. And, it's ridiculously easy to put that Lance over the Ascent's rating. Exceeding the manufacturer rating isn't a good idea. A safety margin doesn't exist to be eaten into by ignoring the ratings. I didn't state opinion. I'm moving on.
 

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I'm not debating it, and, btw, I work in insurance. And, it's ridiculously easy to put that Lance over the Ascent's rating. Exceeding the manufacturer rating isn't a good idea. A safety margin doesn't exist to be eaten into by ignoring the ratings. I didn't state opinion. I'm moving on.
I would debate with any insurance company to prove the 1685 exceeds any rating Subaru provided because it's very easy to prove that it doesn't.

If any insurance company gives you a hard time about it, move on to the next one. I already know for a fact I can find an insurance company willing to insure the Lance because I asked my Insurance Agency when I first considered one. I had the insurance all lined up and I was ready to buy, but then I decided to wait another year before I retired. And yes, they asked for the specs of the trailer and the Ascent.

I encourage anyone else considering the 1685 to first check with your insurance company or agency before you buy a Lance 1685 or any trailer.
 

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...your insurance WILL fight you over paying any claims because its GVWR clearly exceeds the Ascent's rating...
I'm going to say no. Load it up to </= 5000lb and you're good. A higher GVWR on the trailer is just more safety margin for the trailer.
 
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