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I recently drove my Ascent (Limited with stock 20" wheels) in about 7" of fresh snow--not far, maybe 3-4 miles. Near end of the trip, I felt the front end of the car literally start to oscillate up and down and almost lurch like I was going over speed bumps at about 12-15 mph---it felt like someone what jumping on the bumper while I was driving. I limped it home and looked at the wheels. All four were completely packed with snow and were causing the wheels to be severely out of balance. When I got home, I had to melt the snow from the insides of the wheels and around the brake calipers and rotors with a hairdryer and long handled spoon. I literally could not see the brake calipers and the backsides of the wheels were completely full. I would guess you could have taken 2 quarts of snow out of each rim. It took about 30 minutes/tire. Once I got the snow out, it was fine. I've never had another vehicle do this. The other thing is after driving in inclement weather and letting the car sit for a day or two, the brakes sound like a love sick whale when I back out of the garage....loud enough that my wife came outside. I know it's surface rust on the rotors most likely, but this is crazy. It seems to go away once you start moving forward, but it's embarrassing to be honest.

Anyone else experience this? I'm hoping this isn't going to happen every time I drive in snow or it's going to be a long winter.

I hate to say it, but the little annoyances are really starting to add up.
 

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2020 Ascent, 2011 WRX, 2009 Outback
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Have not noticed it on the Ascent yet, but it has been a mild winter. It happens all the time on my WRX with the steelies, but that is my fault for playing and having too much fun in the snow...lol.

Ill keep an eye on it when the snow does start to dump on us.
 

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2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
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This is common with many vehicles and not just the wheels, but also the wheel wells because of the materials used to line them for sound reduction.
 

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2020 CWP Touring
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Both of those things are pretty common on all vehicles in my experience (and I don't drive a lot in the snow). I tend to see it more in the front wheels because they're often the ones traveling at an angle to the snow (when understeering). Any time you get contamination on the brake rotor (rust, etc.), you'll get uneven pressure when applying the brake and they'll groan and make all sorts of noise. Our driveway is very steep and this is most prominent for me just after a car wash. The rotors don't even need rust -- they just need water. But lots of brake at a slow speed is a recipe for this type of noise.
 

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I worked in the Sierras and ran into this often. The solution is to ride the brakes, which heat up the rotors and calipers. This will remove the snow off the wheel assembly. However, the wheel wells stay packed. I discovered I needed to swing my steering hard left and right to keep that area from packing up. I once drove a straight section of road for a couple miles that then took a bend. I could not steer the bend and ended up in the ditch, still unable to steer. Ha!
 

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Both things a pretty common on many vehicles. My Ridgeline was bad for snow packing in the wheels putting them horribly out of balance after it would melt a bit and refreeze. My solution was when I got home after knowingly driving through deep wet snow was to squirt some windshield washer fluid in the gaps in the rims. Some rotors just seem to get surface rust on them rediculously quick. The stock ones on my Ascent do it too. After a couple stops they’re back to normal. My wife’s old Civic was the same way, hers improved as the rotors wore down a bit. Hopefully it will be the same on the Ascent.
 

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I recently drove my Ascent (Limited with stock 20" wheels) in about 7" of fresh snow--not far, maybe 3-4 miles. Near end of the trip, I felt the front end of the car literally start to oscillate up and down and almost lurch like I was going over speed bumps at about 12-15 mph---it felt like someone what jumping on the bumper while I was driving. I limped it home and looked at the wheels. All four were completely packed with snow and were causing the wheels to be severely out of balance. When I got home, I had to melt the snow from the insides of the wheels and around the brake calipers and rotors with a hairdryer and long handled spoon. I literally could not see the brake calipers and the backsides of the wheels were completely full. I would guess you could have taken 2 quarts of snow out of each rim. It took about 30 minutes/tire. Once I got the snow out, it was fine. I've never had another vehicle do this. The other thing is after driving in inclement weather and letting the car sit for a day or two, the brakes sound like a love sick whale when I back out of the garage....loud enough that my wife came outside. I know it's surface rust on the rotors most likely, but this is crazy. It seems to go away once you start moving forward, but it's embarrassing to be honest.

Anyone else experience this? I'm hoping this isn't going to happen every time I drive in snow or it's going to be a long winter.

I hate to say it, but the little annoyances are really starting to add up.
I can not say I have experience with a love sick whale but the snow packs the wheel wells frequently. I got in the habit of mostly clearing it when I stop.
 

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I worked in the Sierras and ran into this often. The solution is to ride the brakes, which heat up the rotors and calipers. This will remove the snow off the wheel assembly. However, the wheel wells stay packed. I discovered I needed to swing my steering hard left and right to keep that area from packing up. I once drove a straight section of road for a couple miles that then took a bend. I could not steer the bend and ended up in the ditch, still unable to steer. Ha!
I had this happen this weekend on trip up through Wisconsin to buy pies. Actually got stuck and had to be pulled out by a tow truck, since there was so much snow in the ditch the passenger wheels weren't making contact with the ground. 8.9"of clearance and X-Mode couldn't save me from a $130 tow bill, and it took about 15 miles of subsequent driving at highways speeds to clear most of the snow from the wheels and wells afterwards. Thankfully it was a warmer +34 degree day so I didn't have to actually manually clean them to get home
 

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It is common with almost all vehicles. I don’t clear mine because I drive a mile and it’s packed again. All of my snow is usually fresh when I drive on it and the first tracks out so it tends to pack up quickly.

The shaking is annoying though but usually comes off by time I am out of the snow line for 20 min or so.
 
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