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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is anyone aware of any videos that show the Ascent doing the roller test that you often see the Outback and Forester performing?
 

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No I haven't seen that test yet, but it would be interesting since the other Subies do well.
 

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Probably won't since Subaru's AWD system is the same across it's offerings. If you've seen one, you've seen them all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am curious to see if a single wheel with traction can make the larger Ascent climb the ramp. I'm also interested in seeing results with X-Mode and Dual Mode X-Mode (I know the Ascent doesn't have it yet).
 

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TFLC channel does those roller tests, but they are no longer allowed to test Subarus.
They bought an Outback and tested that a while back. No more Subaru loaners though, to bad really, only Subaru loses with that attitude.
 

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Probably won't since Subaru's AWD system is the same across it's offerings. If you've seen one, you've seen them all.
Not true, Subaru has 4 different AWD systems. Here is a general rundown...

1. Our Ascents have the Active AWD system. It is the most used system as it is gears for fuel economy. Imprezas, Foresters Outbacks and Legacies use this system. 60:40 torque split normally but it gets changes when the need arises.

2. The next is Viscous Center Differential AWD system and that is reserved for the manual transmission Subarus. 50:50 torque split.

3. Third system is the Varible Torque Distribution (VTD) AWD, this one is for the performance Subarus with automatic transmissions. Currently only the CVT equiped WRX and the Subaru Levorg 2.0GT use this system. It use to be on the 5 speed auto Outbacks, Legacies, WRX and Tribeca. The split is 45:55 with more rear bias.
You would think the Ascent would get the VTD system as it is the flagship Subaru, but I guess fuel economy and price point are the reasons it is not offered on the Ascent. Or its Subaru being Subaru. They make weird decisions like this all the time.

4. The fourth is the multi-mode DCCD AWD system. This is reserved for the Subaru WRX STI model and it a more advance version of the VTD system were the driver can adjust the lockup of the center diff.

Here is a link to Subaru Corporate detailing the AWD systems.
 

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Probably won't since Subaru's AWD system is the same across it's offerings. If you've seen one, you've seen them all.
Subaru has four AWD platforms, not one. Our AWD platform is the same as the one used in the roller tests of the Forester and Outback, but we have a lot more torque and different gearing, making it a little easier for the Ascent to handle the test. We have a 60/40 Active Torque Split system, capable of full transfer in either direction.

EDIT: not sure why the response from @laufu did not show up until after I posted mine...
 

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I wonder why they are no longer allowed to test Subarus?
Pretty sure they're allowed to. I don't think they feel like buying one for a few minutes test they already know the outcome of. ;)
 

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They bought an Outback and tested that a while back. No more Subaru loaners though, to bad really, only Subaru loses with that attitude.
Think they damaged a loaner and since then, Subaru won’t lend them one. They’ve been pretty biased against Subaru since then, which is pretty apparent whenever they do something that involves a subaru
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Here is a video from them showing the Outback fail the roller test


EDIT: Hmmm, I wonder why they didn't try the test with VDC:ON and XMode:ON? Also, at the end, it looked like the single wheel that wasn't on the roller did gain traction and start to move the vehicle. As the driver noted, it did push the vehicle to the side a bit (but this is expected if the other three wheels had no traction). I wonder if he just gave up too quickly. It looked like perhaps it was starting to drive up the incline.
 

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They redid one of their off road vids after getting hammered in the comments, and the Subie passed.

I wonder why they keep testing the Subies in ways that make no sense, like mentioned in the comments above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Someone in the comments made a good point about the fundamental flaw in the way the test was conducted. It's hard to unsee the bias once you know about it
Yes, you are correct. The previous roller tests were performed with all wheels on rollers (with one set locked). This test had the wheel with traction lower/uneven because it wasn't on rollers. So clearly a harder test than before. Looks like several people in the comments sections are also questioning why they never tried VDC and X-Mode both enabled (as they always manually disabled VDC). As one comment said, if X-Mode somehow hindered VDC, then enabling X-Mode should automatically disable it (which it doesn't). And I still can't figure out why he let off the throttle when the wheel without the rollers finally gained traction and started to move?

I would agree that this isn't the best test.
 

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Yes, you are correct. The previous roller tests were performed with all wheels on rollers (with one set locked). This test had the wheel with traction lower/uneven because it wasn't on rollers. So clearly a harder test than before. Looks like several people in the comments sections are also questioning why they never tried VDC and X-Mode both enabled (as they always manually disabled VDC). As one comment said, if X-Mode somehow hindered VDC, then enabling X-Mode should automatically disable it (which it doesn't). And I still can't figure out why he let off the throttle when the wheel without the rollers finally gained traction and started to move?

I would agree that this isn't the best test.
I have seen a number of their videos, I think the majority of them are good vids, just until they test subarus, ie which is better in deep snow, a purpose build Ford raptor with snow tires or a stock outback. They have a pretty bad bias, something that is commented on alot in the comments section
 

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TFLC doesn't get Subaru vehicles anymore after they took a stock 4cyl Outback and put it on a fairly major offroad course against I think a Ford Raptor and then when the Outback got stuck they sat there blaming the CVT saying it wasn't sending power to the wheel. Then according to them they had scratched the paint on the side a bit during this test.

When Subaru received the car back they came and took all the Subaru vehicles TFLC had because they were upset the car was so scratched up and it threw off the delivery to the next test client. This was according to TFLC as Subaru has not said anything publicly.

Fast forward to today and TFLC buys an Outback and tests it but in the process they they are much more careful because they own the car and can't just hand it back to Subaru. At the same time they still test the Outback against much more capable vehicles such as an old Jeep Cherokee with 4WD or a Nissan Titan and act like it isn't living up to its ability. In many of these tests they try once say it didn't make it and back off.

It is to the point I don't even watch TFLC anymore because I wonder if they are like this with other vehicles and I just don't realize it. Granted I think there video content has become longer and I feel has less substance in many cases.
 
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