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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've went through all the alignment-related threads I could find on this board, hoping to find a scan or screen shot of an alignment sheet, but didn't find one. The Ascent seems too new to be able to find this on my regular internet DIY haunts, too. Does anyone know the alignment specs from Subaru on our Ascents? I don't have a specific concern about my vehicle in particular...but I'm curious how Subaru sets these up.

Thanks in advance.
 

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This was posted in another thread here on this forum
It is post number 21 in the steering issues caused by damaged tire thread posted by XHUT
Perhaps this will help?
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4. Didn't get print out, but found only minor adjustment needed.
5.
20200112_092019.jpg
 

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Here are the official specs from the Ascent service manual. Note that there are 60 minutes in a degree so divide minutes by 60 to get the degrees in decimals. For example, 0°30' is 0.5°. And by using the tolerances, the specified ranges can be easily figured out.

Text Line Font Number Parallel
 

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As an addendum, pay close attention to the "difference between RH and LH sides" specs. Even my original alignment from the dealer was slightly out of spec. The dealer's listed ranges weren't quite correct either. Not that it matters much in the overall behaviour of the car, but I like to nitpick.

After my recent lift kit installation, I went to my usual independent shop specialized in only doing wheel alignments. They don't even need any specs from manufacturer to do the alignment. When I got home and compared the printout specs to Subaru's specs, everything's correct. I'm happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you both! I was suspecting some aggressive camber and toe settings on the front that would lead to the very quick steering response commonly noted here, but these settings are pretty neutral.
 

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Would you recommend an alignment even if there are no alignment symptoms presenting? If so, at what interval? Springtime in Denver brings out all the potholes. This on top of the politicians playing games with road repair. Bike lanes seem to be a priority. I am trying to figure out the sweet spot timing for the alignment. I can get 25% off from my dealer now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Would you recommend an alignment even if there are no alignment symptoms presenting?
If by symptoms you mean both dynamics (pulling, etc.) and tire wear, in my opinion, absolutely not. If your car drives straight and the tires are wearing fine, don't touch it.

I'm a pretty particular person when it comes to stuff like this. I've very rarely received an alignment to my specification. The steering wheel usually isn't perfectly straight, or maybe the car pulls very slightly to one side or the other, etc. I typically don't have time to keep carrying my car in for fixes for stuff like this, so I've fixed these issues at home before. Once I know the specs, and where they set the car, I know what to adjust to fix whatever I want fixed without putting something else out of whack.

Tire shops will push an alignment on me even though the tires wore nearly perfectly. No thank you. :) The car drives how I like it, the tires are wearing good...please don't touch it.

Our Ascent is perfect, at least as far as dynamics go. Tire wear seems consistent with other vehicles so far. We have about 1,200 miles on it and the front tires are just starting to get a bit of directional wear at the very outside edges (rub your hand rearward and feel the ridges, rub your hand forward and it's smooth). This is a very typical wear pattern for front-heavy vehicles. This will eventually switch to the other side of the car and that pattern will start to wear "the other way". The "backwards" pattern will eventually wear flat, and then start in in the "forward" direction again. I usually rotate tires when I do oil, at 5,000 mile intervals.

Tire wear is, of course, one result of alignment. There are compromises all around. An aggressive alignment that creates crisp handling is often at the expense of tire wear. An alignment setting that produces very neutral wear will often feel a little sloppy to the driver, because that scrub angle hasn't been achieved yet when the driver turns the wheel. The tolerances allowed are usually fairly broad, and two alignments that are both "correct" can feel a little different.

Anyway...no, I would not recommend an alignment "just cuz". If you're not happy with how it drives, or you have issues with tire wear, then that's a different story.
 

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If by symptoms you mean both dynamics (pulling, etc.) and tire wear, in my opinion, absolutely not. If your car drives straight and the tires are wearing fine, don't touch it.

I'm a pretty particular person when it comes to stuff like this. I've very rarely received an alignment to my specification. The steering wheel usually isn't perfectly straight, or maybe the car pulls very slightly to one side or the other, etc. I typically don't have time to keep carrying my car in for fixes for stuff like this, so I've fixed these issues at home before. Once I know the specs, and where they set the car, I know what to adjust to fix whatever I want fixed without putting something else out of whack.

Tire shops will push an alignment on me even though the tires wore nearly perfectly. No thank you. :) The car drives how I like it, the tires are wearing good...please don't touch it.

Our Ascent is perfect, at least as far as dynamics go. Tire wear seems consistent with other vehicles so far. We have about 1,200 miles on it and the front tires are just starting to get a bit of directional wear at the very outside edges (rub your hand rearward and feel the ridges, rub your hand forward and it's smooth). This is a very typical wear pattern for front-heavy vehicles. This will eventually switch to the other side of the car and that pattern will start to wear "the other way". The "backwards" pattern will eventually wear flat, and then start in in the "forward" direction again. I usually rotate tires when I do oil, at 5,000 mile intervals.

Tire wear is, of course, one result of alignment. There are compromises all around. An aggressive alignment that creates crisp handling is often at the expense of tire wear. An alignment setting that produces very neutral wear will often feel a little sloppy to the driver, because that scrub angle hasn't been achieved yet when the driver turns the wheel. The tolerances allowed are usually fairly broad, and two alignments that are both "correct" can feel a little different.

Anyway...no, I would not recommend an alignment "just cuz". If you're not happy with how it drives, or you have issues with tire wear, then that's a different story.
Thank you for the detail. I have just over 25,000 miles and the orignial tire tread is great. No pulling either so I guess I will just leave it. I rotate it as you do. I also just changed out my winter tires.
 

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Just heard an interview sharing an interesting alignment story. The interviewee owned a custom alignment shop and one day he had a metro to align. No problem. Straight forward job. 10 000 miles later the car is back and the new high end 80 000 mile tires are bald. He replaced the tires under warranty and checks the alignment specs. They are all in the green. No problems. Everything is checking out so he scratches his head and releases the vehicle. 6,000 miles later the car is back in the shop. Tires are almost bald and again the alignment specs are good. He can not figure it out. So he asks to talk with owner of vehicle who happens to be waiting in the shop. He walks in and sees a 400+ pound women. Now he understands but is clearly in a predicament on how to respectfully break the news. He gets her into the drivers seat while on the rack and the alignment specs indicates it is now way off in the red. While she is in the vehicle he adjusts the alignment and the specs are green once again.
No future visits from the metro for bad tires or problem alignments. I never considered how significant weight distribution could impact driving, alignment and tire wear.
 

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A Geo Metro? The drive might have accounted for 20% of the GVW.

Back when I worked for a shop which did lifetime alignments, I'd ask the driver to take me for a ride if they came in frequently for re-dos. I'd find various driving "techniques" which were the root cause. Ie: forcing the wheel past full lock or hitting speed bumps without slowing down. This was back before rack and pinion and there were more moving parts to loosen or bend.
 

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A Geo Metro? The drive might have accounted for 20% of the GVW.

Back when I worked for a shop which did lifetime alignments, I'd ask the driver to take me for a ride if they came in frequently for re-dos. I'd find various driving "techniques" which were the root cause. Ie: forcing the wheel past full lock or hitting speed bumps without slowing down. This was back before rack and pinion and there were more moving parts to loosen or bend.
Pretty close on the guess. 1693 lbs curb weight.
 

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Just heard an interview sharing an interesting alignment story. The interviewee owned a custom alignment shop and one day he had a metro to align. No problem. Straight forward job. 10 000 miles later the car is back and the new high end 80 000 mile tires are bald. He replaced the tires under warranty and checks the alignment specs. They are all in the green. No problems. Everything is checking out so he scratches his head and releases the vehicle. 6,000 miles later the car is back in the shop. Tires are almost bald and again the alignment specs are good. He can not figure it out. So he asks to talk with owner of vehicle who happens to be waiting in the shop. He walks in and sees a 400+ pound women. Now he understands but is clearly in a predicament on how to respectfully break the news. He gets her into the drivers seat while on the rack and the alignment specs indicates it is now way off in the red. While she is in the vehicle he adjusts the alignment and the specs are green once again.
No future visits from the metro for bad tires or problem alignments. I never considered how significant weight distribution could impact driving, alignment and tire wear.
I actually pack my car with my most common gear setup before each alignment for that reason.
 
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