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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had my tires replaced at 25k miles this morning. Naturally, it made sense to get my alignment checked, and sure enough I needed one.

Afterwards, my camber and toe were back within tolerance... but my caster was out on the front. I believe tolerance is 3.5-5.0 degrees. One side was 3.0 degrees, the other was 3.3 degrees.

The guy at the tire shop said that caster is something that they cannot adjust. He said the only way to fix it would be to take it back to the dealer, and they often have to drill another hole to adjust things. I cannot find anything online backing this up.

He also said that it should not cause the car to pull to either side, nor should it have any appreciable effect on treadwear. From everything I've read online, this part does seem to be true.

What are the community's thoughts on this? Should I be addressing it with the dealer, or is it really not a big deal? I dont have any issues with how it drives or tracks.
 

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CASTER is not adjustable...

ASCENT SERVICE MANUAL
CASTER INSPECTION
1.
Place the front wheel on the turning radius gauge. Make sure the ground contact surfaces of the front and rear wheels are at the same height.
2.
Set the adapter into the center of wheel, and then set the wheel alignment gauge.

(a)​
Alignment gauge​
(b)​
Turning radius gauge​
(c)​
Adapter
3.
Measure the caster angle in accordance with the operation manual for wheel alignment gauge.
Caster​
4°13′​
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
CASTER is not adjustable...

Thanke for the details.
So then... dumb question...
What is the point of measuring the caster, and/or having a tolerance for it, if it is not adjustable?
(The OCD side of is struggling with the RED indicator on the alignment report that indicates a problem...)
 

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The reason it's measured is if the car was damaged in some way. A bad enough pothole can bend all kinds of shit - enough to throw off the castor. If it can't be adjusted back into spec, then parts need to be replaced. Whether your particular car needs to be within that supposed castor spec is up to you...
 

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Thanke for the details.
So then... dumb question...
What is the point of measuring the caster, and/or having a tolerance for it, if it is not adjustable?
(The OCD side of is struggling with the RED indicator on the alignment report that indicates a problem...)
no OCD here, but the question was the elephant in the room.
 

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That’s not much of a difference. It won’t be noticeable by most people. Now if you start getting into multi degree differences, then you’ll have a problem. Caster pointing forward (I forget which was neg and pos) meaning the angle of your struts points toward the front gives you better handling but harsher ride quality. Caster pointed backward gives you a smoother ride because the back facing angle deflects some of the force from the road, but also less control (or decreased response) from the car. Zero caster would mean your suspension is completely straight up and down, giving the benefit of better control without too much added road force. There a few things that can be used to correct this. Other than body and up to total suspension replacement, there are camber/caster shims. The other that I have been eyeing for a while are the pillow top mounts with camber/caster adjustment. These are made by whiteline and Cusco for other models. But if the bolt pattern is the same then they should be useable for the ascent. I think I saw a few other manufacturers but you’ll have to search for those.
 
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