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If your side mirrors are adjusted properly, you don't have blind spots! Here is how:

This one explains how to adjust the side mirrors
https://seniordriving.aaa.com/improve-your-driving-skills/prepare-drive/how-use-adjust-your-mirrors/

This one explains better how it works
https://www.caranddriver.com/features/a15131074/how-to-adjust-your-mirrors-to-avoid-blind-spots/

Ironically, driving-tests.org explained the WRONG way to adjust your side mirrors!

I've been doing this for a long time, but after my girlfriend drove the car I had to fix them again. Still need to get her used to doing her mirrors this way.

Once you have them adjusted, have someone walk around the car. You'll be able to see them all the way around the car! As soon as they leave your rear-view mirror, they are already in your side mirror. As soon as they lead your side mirror, you can see them in the side window. Definitely no blinds spots that a car or even motorcycle can hide in.
 

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I respectfully disagree. Having the side of the vehicle slightly visible in the side view mirror when seated normally gives a reference point so you can tell exactly where everything is in relation to you. Imho the best way to avoid having a blind spot is to always be aware of surrounding vehicles, check the side view mirror and then a quick look over the shoulder.

But it really comes down to whatever you’re most comfortable or used to doing
 

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Yes! :grin:

The Car & Driver link is even in my signature. I know when you try this at first it feels weird, but it's probably the best method. I understand it's somewhat comforting to see your own car in the mirror, but it's unnecessary once you learn to trust that your car is where it is and it ain't going anywhere. Even my wife has adopted this method - I find this pretty spectacular in itself. :tango_face_surprise

Of course, if you do it differenly it doesn't matter if you're a good driver - no harm no foul.

I wish more publishers or news outlets would start public campaigns for driver's education. A short video showing what you look like from others' perspective when you don't use turn signals or turn on headlights in bad weather would be a great start.
 

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As a person that rides motorcycle daily, nothing and I mean NOTHING is better to check if someone is on the side of your car then turning your head to do a shoulder check. I have had dozens of cases where I was just beside the drivers door well out of ranged of their side mirror and they just look in the mirror and change lanes. Dozens. I watched them as they did it. When you do a shoulder check your vision scans the area from your front bumper to the back of your car. Doing a mirror check is just checking the mirror, you get soo focused on that little reflective surface that nothing else is looked for. So please. I don't care if you set up your mirrors, don't set up your mirrors. Please, and I am begging you, do a shoulder check.

And if you really want to be a good person. Do this regardless on how you set up your mirrors.

1.) Turn signal.
2.) Check mirrors.
3.) Shoulder check.
4.) Slow merge if safe.
5.) Turn off signal.
 

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I respectfully disagree. Having the side of the vehicle slightly visible in the side view mirror when seated normally gives a reference point so you can tell exactly where everything is in relation to you. Imho the best way to avoid having a blind spot is to always be aware of surrounding vehicles, check the side view mirror and then a quick look over the shoulder.

But it really comes down to whatever you’re most comfortable or used to doing
Why?
All you're doing is getting the same information from 3 different mirrors.

The camera in the Touring is way better than a standard mirror but if we talk from a standard mirror here's how I have mine setup described as a car is catching up and passing you.

Cars in the next lane over are seen in the main rear view mirror as they approach. As they leave part of their car will enter the "blind spot". However, there is a point where I can see their tail in the main rear view and their front driver (left side) or front passenger (right side) in the side mirror. Then as they start to leave the side mirror I see their front bumper by glancing without turning my head with my eyes as I can still see the rear of the vehicle in the mirror.

As pointed out earlier you still need to head over the shoulder or as I do lean side to side while looking in the mirror to make sure there's not a smart car or a bike in your much smaller blind spot. If you're paying attention you will know the car is there because you saw them approach to begin with because you're paying attention all the time not just when you want to change lanes eh?
 

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I tried to adjust mirrors like this and I agree that is helps eliminate blind spots looking at mirrors only. But I think that is fundamentally wrong to think that you don't need shoulder checks and it seams that is the whole point of this setup.
It may work in ideal environment like parking lots. But if roads are not straight, don't have clear lane markings, with bicycles/motorcycles, vehicles changing multiple lanes (and accelerating from far side-behind into lane that you are turning in), shoulder check still may give you better idea what is going on around you.
Driving in Chicagoland, I use all 3 mirrors strictly to check what is going on behind me (and far left and right) and shoulder checks for near left/right.
 

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Cwnannwn said it best. Shoulder check is always required for safely changing lanes. I feel like too many people come to rely only on their blind spot monitors rather that use them as an additional safety measure.
I’ve driven over 20 years with my sideview mirrors the way I like them with no accidents. it works for me to see the side of the car. I’d challenge anyone to convince me otherwise ?
And I’m not saying doing the mirrors the way suggested above is wrong to be clear
 

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Sadly, with the Ascent mirrors (and those in many SUVs of similar sizes), the method above does cause blind spots for motorcyclists, which I am of.

Most states instruct motorcycle riders should hold a side of the lane, or, when driving in groups, it's suggested to be left, right, left, right down the lane. This creates a blind spot in an area a motorcycle may be sitting that even head turning can't see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Cwnannwn said it best. Shoulder check is always required for safely changing lanes. I feel like too many people come to rely only on their blind spot monitors rather that use them as an additional safety measure.
I’ve driven over 20 years with my sideview mirrors the way I like them with no accidents. it works for me to see the side of the car. I’d challenge anyone to convince me otherwise ?
And I’m not saying doing the mirrors the way suggested above is wrong to be clear
So I do it this way with the mirrors out method.
1. Check rear view
2. Check side view I'm going to
3. Look through window that side.
4. Proceed into lane.

The nice thing about mirrors out is that I can see a car to the side of me in step 2, so I don't even get to step 3 unless I'm almost positive it'll be a successful lane change. So step 2 gets me looking back forward quicker than it did in mirrors back.

Try it.

Have a person walk 360 around your vehicle and note all the places you can't see them with the "see the car" mirror setup.

Then set up the mirrors as mentioned in the article. Then have a person walk around the vehicle again and see the difference. There shouldn't be any place where they fully disappear (or not more than a fraction of a sec).

I too had over 20 years driving accident free with the other mirrors but I did have a few close calls that I caught at the last second that the mirrors out method catches right away.

As my race driving instructor said, "You don't need to see the back of your own car. If the back of your car is overtaking you, you have way worse problems!"

Yes, there is an adjustment period. Once that is past, it's much much better! :D
 
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Optimal mirror position and shoulder-checking are not mutually exclusive.

For the record, nobody is saying not to check over your shoulders. I hope that we can consider that a given, no matter how the mirrors are adjusted.
Actually the article you have in your sig says
"This obviates the need to glance over your shoulder to safely change lanes as well as the need for an expensive blind-spot warning system.
Sadly, with the Ascent mirrors (and those in many SUVs of similar sizes), the method above does cause blind spots for motorcyclists, which I am of.


So I do it this way with the mirrors out method.
1. Check rear view
2. Check side view I'm going to
3. Look through window that side.
4. Proceed into lane.

Then set up the mirrors as mentioned in the article. Then have a person walk around the vehicle again and see the difference. There shouldn't be any place where they fully disappear (or not more than a fraction of a sec).

I too had over 20 years driving accident free with the other mirrors but I did have a few close calls that I caught at the last second that the mirrors out method catches right away.
Do the shoulder check from the front bumper to the as far back as you can see. It takes 2 seconds, and will save a life. Your "blind" zone free will not cover everything. I can guarantee I can park my bike in your blind spot no matter what you do.
I have been driving for, oh my god, a long long long time. 25+ years. I have literally put hundreds of thousands of miles down, used to be limo driver. I have had 1 accident, not my fault, and 1 ticket, I was on a bicycle at the time. How long or what you drive or how good you are means nothing.

See below. Think where I could ride where you would not see me for 2 seconds.

https://image.slidesharecdn.com/bli...415/95/blind-spot-ppt-6-638.jpg?cb=1483900474
 

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I’ll try the ‘right way’ on my way to work today.
Pre-thoughts:
—the ‘common way’ has no blind spot behind the vehicle while the other creates 2 new (thought small) blindspots. See the image below I copied from Robert.Mauro’s post
—an extra few degrees of visibility is gained on either side using the ‘right way’ though a shoulder check and situational awareness also covers the same area
—we all agree a shoulder check is necessary, especially for the safety of bikers. Bikers are also responsible to make sure they don’t remain in a blind spot if not necessary, just as a car should do the same when passing a truck
 

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I’ll try the ‘right way’ on my way to work today.
Pre-thoughts:
—the ‘common way’ has no blind spot behind the vehicle while the other creates 2 new (thought small) blindspots. See the image below I copied from Robert.Mauro’s post
—an extra few degrees of visibility is gained on either side using the ‘right way’ though a shoulder check and situational awareness also covers the same area
—we all agree a shoulder check is necessary, especially for the safety of bikers. Bikers are also responsible to make sure they don’t remain in a blind spot if not necessary, just as a car should do the same when passing a truck
If your use "traditional" mirror setup, there are significant differences between left and right side visibility so pictures attached are not completely accurate. What is not taken into consideration is that driver is sitting on the left so visibility angles are different left and right.
For example (with 2015 Forester, "traditional" mirror setup), looking at the right mirror only (even without shoulder check) I don't have any blind spots on the right because of angle that you are looking at right mirror. Your peripheral vision covers trough passengers window and back passenger side is covered partialy by peripheral vision and completely by right review mirror.
On the left, it is very different, angle is much sharper, and peripheral vision covers only (part) of driver's side window and depending on your sitting position you are more blinded by B pillar. Shoulder check is necessary!
 

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Yes, please...

Do the shoulder check from the front bumper to the as far back as you can see. It takes 2 seconds, and will save a life. Your "blind" zone free will not cover everything. I can guarantee I can park my bike in your blind spot no matter what you do.
I have been driving for, oh my god, a long long long time. 25+ years. I have literally put hundreds of thousands of miles down, used to be limo driver. I have had 1 accident, not my fault, and 1 ticket, I was on a bicycle at the time. How long or what you drive or how good you are means nothing.

See below. Think where I could ride where you would not see me for 2 seconds.

https://image.slidesharecdn.com/bli...415/95/blind-spot-ppt-6-638.jpg?cb=1483900474
Yes, agreed, ALWAYS do the over the shoulder check for as far back as one can see - blind spot warnings and mirror positions aside. As someone who's been riding for decades, I beg everyone to PLEASE do that. Pretty please.

In return, I promise to continue to be one of the bikers who never zips between cars by riding down the line.
 

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Bikers are also responsible to make sure they don’t remain in a blind spot if not necessary, just as a car should do the same when passing a truck
I'd hope most bikers are aware of truck blind spots. But, the interesting thing is blind spots on SUVs are so variable. In my 2010 Outback, I could see the entire area on the passenger side indicated by the stars in the image by using my rear view mirror. I could also see some part of the area on the driver's side via the rear view mirror. In the Ascent, that's not possible.

I hope ALL bikers assume that's a blind spot for every car. The rare times I ride anymore (got rid of my bike a while back, and don't borrow one much anymore - no time), I know I never forget.
 

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... the interesting thing is blind spots on SUVs are so variable.

It's more like on all vehicles...... :smile_big:


The way the pillars are designed/configured as well as the physical size/shape of the mirrors and their placement, along with how the driver sits and has his/her head positioned - that all affects the blind-spots before we even talk about the more routinely talked-about aspects of the equation, like head-turning and mirror setup.


And everyone, please also remember:


Just because you do turn your head and glance in that direction does not mean that you will actually "SEE." Our senses are incredibly unreliable beast, and our decisions can be affected tremendously by what our preconceived notions may be, i.e. what we "believe" to be true, the "Orient" part of the OODA-loop.


Drivers should train themselves to think that when they turn their heads, they WILL see a vehicle in the blind spot, that they WILL happen upon something that they've missed.



Don't let your mirror setup or how you may think you're an active/aware driver or even the driver-assist/safety technologies in our incredible modern vehicles preclude you from actually catching that one rare instance. :smile:
 

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In my experience, there are many occasions where cargo has obstructed the view from rear view mirror. In such cases the traditional setup helped me to get the view of back side and shoulder check eliminated any blind spots. So I think the traditional method still has some merits.

For cargo I mentioned it only takes a small vacation of couple of days to have the view obstructed( in my case 1 medium suit case, a cooler, one stroller on Jeep Cherokee or return from winter/ tire swap Ascent limited).
 

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So I drove part of the 30mi trek to work with my mirrors in both configurations. I can’t get past what felt like a huge blind spot behind the left D pillar with it in the ‘right method’ so I went back and forth a few times, mostly driving slower than traffic to watch vehicles as they passed me. I found there was barely a difference on the right side.
If people were to allow room when they pass, that method may work better for me, but they tend to get up your butt and then appear all of the sudden in the side mirror. A Dodge Dart fit into this gap perfectly this morning so a bike may be completely invisible.
Conversely if you’re used to this method and you switch to the common method, you may be surprised by the blind spot farther out to the left.
It may just come down to your driving style and how you’re taught as to which method is better. Saying one is right may be a little presumptuous. Training drivers to use all available methods is the right way
 
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