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Hi everyone,

We got our CWP Touring last weekend (traded in our 2011 Tribeca). Waited exactly two months for the new ride. My son named her KitKat coz of the brown leather seats.

Still learning and exploring the features and settings. I, however, tested the 120V receptacle with a tester and it indicated “open ground”. Is it usable? I didn’t plug anything yet.

Anyone experience using the outlet?
 

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So cars, boats and RVs have a unique situation with ground. With a car or off grid RV that never gets plugged into a grounded system ie really grounded meaning wire tied to a rod driven into the earth.

The reason you get a ground fault error in a car, boat etc is typically because the battery neg cable shares the same grounding bolt /source as the plug being tested. The simple tester is looking for a complete circuit and it finds one given the neg cable from the battery is likely bolted to the same ground as the inverter plug.

So yes this is typical and safe. Also keep in mind this plug is powered by a very small inverter for very small devices. Most uses for these plugs are 110volt powered devices that are actually 12 volt or less meaning the power cord has a transformer that steps the power down from 110. Example being your lap top that small box on the power cord is actually dropping the voltage from 110 to 12volts or less so you don’t fry your lap top.

Having said that some small devices are straight up 110volt devices like for example the wifes hair dryer. I do not advise using a hair dryer on your Ascent plug.

Here is why
Electric devices and electric systems are designed to use or support a very specific electric load. Thats why we place fuses on everything. You exceed the system design you blow a fuse vs frying a component and starting a fire.

The Ascent wiring and electrical system is only good for 10-15amps peak load max meaning constant 10-15amp load is going to blow fuses if it doesn’t pop a fuse electrical components and wires will get damaged.

A Lap top or even small LCD TV with gaming gear might draw 5-8amps max. A hair dryer can easily draw 8-10amps especially if its a high powered unit and a bit worn out.

A air compressor can easily pull 10amps!! Air compressors should always be connected directly the the 12volt battery this way you don’t damage the vehicle electrical components between the battery and the air compressor.
 

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So cars, boats and RVs have a unique situation with ground. With a car or off grid RV that never gets plugged into a grounded system ie really grounded meaning wire tied to a rod driven into the earth.

The reason you get a ground fault error in a car, boat etc is typically because the battery neg cable shares the same grounding bolt /source as the plug being tested. The simple tester is looking for a complete circuit and it finds one given the neg cable from the battery is likely bolted to the same ground as the inverter plug.

So yes this is typical and safe. Also keep in mind this plug is powered by a very small inverter for very small devices. Most uses for these plugs are 110volt powered devices that are actually 12 volt or less meaning the power cord has a transformer that steps the power down from 110. Example being your lap top that small box on the power cord is actually dropping the voltage from 110 to 12volts or less so you don’t fry your lap top.

Having said that some small devices are straight up 110volt devices like for example the wifes hair dryer. I do not advise using a hair dryer on your Ascent plug.

Here is why
Electric devices and electric systems are designed to use or support a very specific electric load. Thats why we place fuses on everything. You exceed the system design you blow a fuse vs frying a component and starting a fire.

The Ascent wiring and electrical system is only good for 10-15amps peak load max meaning constant 10-15amp load is going to blow fuses if it doesn’t pop a fuse electrical components and wires will get damaged.

A Lap top or even small LCD TV with gaming gear might draw 5-8amps max. A hair dryer can easily draw 8-10amps especially if its a high powered unit and a bit worn out.

A air compressor can easily pull 10amps!! Air compressors should always be connected directly the the 12volt battery this way you don’t damage the vehicle electrical components between the battery and the air compressor.
Only use very small wattage electrical devises......the Ascent 120 volt outlet is rated at 100 watts...average hair dryer is 850-1500 watts....never use it for a hair dryer! Maybe a small fan...
 

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Does anyone know which fuse is linked to this plug? I tried to inflate an air bed with it and the pump ran for a second and stopped... can’t seem to decipher the fuse lids and manual diagram (the manual just has the same acronyms the fuse box lids do)
 

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I finally found it. For future readers, the 120V inverter is on the inside fuse box in the #2 slot labeled CIGAR (it is a 20A fuse)
From a "future reader" with a new '21 Touring, THANK YOU.

I didn't find any mentioning of the fuse related info in the PDF owner's manual(s). I checked the device I plugged in for its wattage info, which was not present. I should know better than to just try it.

I have a similar question if you know the answer. What does IG (fuse diagram) stand for and why are there several fuses marked IG? I'm sure they have their differences, but I want to know more.
 

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Follow up:

Today is the day after I overloaded the 120V AC (100W max) power outlet (stopped working). After reading your post, I went out to examine my situation and found that the 120V outlet was working again. I presume the inverter has a "self-healing" or conditions based auto-reset feature. That's cool.

Unfortunately, I got curious about the 20A CIGAR fuse and the two 12V DC (120W max) power outlets, front console and rear hatch. My thought was, if the AC inverter and the two DC outlets are all on the same fuse, and if you were operating all three simultaneously, would that reduce the capacity at each outlet or increase the load on the fuse.

Using a pencil/light style 12V tester (grounded to the hatch latch hook) I found the rear hatch outlet had power <yay!> I was not so fortunate testing the front console outlet because there was no safe place to clip the ground wire and while reaching in with both + & - (trying to keep them separated of course) I heard the fuse pop <sigh>. And it was the CIGAR 20A fuse. And the rear hatch outlet is now dead.

So I have a hypothesis regarding max power capacity but I'm no electrical engineer. I think I found part of my answer at: Volts/Amps/Watts Converter

If 12V/120W = 10A, and if the 20A fuse is for both 12V outlets, then 120W (max) would be supportable during simultaneous operations. But here is my question for the really experienced folks. Does that mean that ONE of the 12V DC outlets would support 240W? What are the other limiting considerations (other than design and warranty)?
 

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Follow up:

Today is the day after I overloaded the 120V AC (100W max) power outlet (stopped working). After reading your post, I went out to examine my situation and found that the 120V outlet was working again. I presume the inverter has a "self-healing" or conditions based auto-reset feature. That's cool.

Unfortunately, I got curious about the 20A CIGAR fuse and the two 12V DC (120W max) power outlets, front console and rear hatch. My thought was, if the AC inverter and the two DC outlets are all on the same fuse, and if you were operating all three simultaneously, would that reduce the capacity at each outlet or increase the load on the fuse.

Using a pencil/light style 12V tester (grounded to the hatch latch hook) I found the rear hatch outlet had power <yay!> I was not so fortunate testing the front console outlet because there was no safe place to clip the ground wire and while reaching in with both + & - (trying to keep them separated of course) I heard the fuse pop <sigh>. And it was the CIGAR 20A fuse. And the rear hatch outlet is now dead.

So I have a hypothesis regarding max power capacity but I'm no electrical engineer. I think I found part of my answer at: Volts/Amps/Watts Converter

If 12V/120W = 10A, and if the 20A fuse is for both 12V outlets, then 120W (max) would be supportable during simultaneous operations. But here is my question for the really experienced folks. Does that mean that ONE of the 12V DC outlets would support 240W? What are the other limiting considerations (other than design and warranty)?
Since both receptacles are on the same circuit they are wired in parallel which would result in reduced amperage if both are being used at the same time. I (amperage)=W (watts) / E (voltage). W = E X I. You have a maximum of 10 amps (due to fused protecting that circuit) in that parallel wiring. If you run one receptacle and surpass the 10 amps it will blow the fuse. If you run two receptacles your voltage in the parallel wiring will remain the same but the amperage available will be reduced at the second receptacle. No matter what you total amperage available is 10 amps for the circuit. With the voltage remaining the same and amperage being reduced your wattage will also be reduced in the parallel circuit. This is why lights sometimes will dim down the line of the circuit if they are all on at the same time and the circuit has too many lighting loads.
 
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